Annapolis Divorce Lawyer, Maryland

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Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Paula J. Peters

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paula Grace Nightingale

Family Law, Adoption, Divorce, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Judith Billage

Adoption, Divorce, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nevin Young

Litigation, Divorce, DUI-DWI, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Dawn M. Green

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura Penn Shanley

Mediation, Trusts, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ronald M Naditch

Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  59 Years

Philip A. Dales

Dispute Resolution, Alimony & Spousal Support, Administrative Law, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kari Fawcett

Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Elizabeth A. Pfenson

Domestic Violence & Neglect, Family Law, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

CONSUMMATION

The actualization of a marriage. Sexual intercourse is required to 'consummate' a marriage. Failure to do so is grounds for divorce or annulment.

PALIMONY

A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other afte... (more...)
A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other after they break up.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Janusz v. Gilliam

... In their Agreement, which was incorporated, but not merged, into the judgment of divorce, the parties agreed that Mr. Gilliam would maintain in effect his survivor's annuity [1] with the federal Civil Service Retirement System, for the benefit of Ms. Janusz. ...

Aleem v. Aleem

... CATHELL, J. Farah Aleem filed suit for a limited divorce from her husband, Irfan Aleem in the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. The husband thereafter filed an Answer and Counterclaim. He raised no jurisdictional objections. ...

Attorney Grievance v. Elmendorf

... On the afternoon of July 28, 2003, Ms. McCarthy and the Respondent exchanged a series of electronic mail messages in which Ms. McCarthy sought information about grounds for divorce. ... Mr. Almand was now representing Ms. Dodson in connection with her divorce. ...