Appleton Eminent Domain Lawyer, Wisconsin


David G. Dudas

Arbitration, Corporate, Construction, Environmental Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

David W. Platt

Corporate, Construction, Criminal, Insurance, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Charles D. Koehler

Eminent Domain, Securities, Business Organization, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Charles J. Hartzheim

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  54 Years
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Andrew J. Rossmeissl

Eminent Domain, Franchising, Business Organization, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Peter A. van Houwelingen

Commercial Leasing, Business & Trade, Business Successions, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Sara K. Micheletti

Power of Attorney, Landlord-Tenant, Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

Greg P. Curtis

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Business Organization
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  30 Years

Ronald W. Tusler

Real Estate, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

William L Stroik

Real Estate, Trusts, Employment, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

SETBACK

The distance between a property boundary and a building. A minimum setback is usually required by law.

LIQUID ASSETS

Business property that can be quickly and easily converted into cash, such as stock, bank accounts and accounts receivable.

SHARED EQUITY MORTGAGE

A home loan in which the lender gets a share of the equity of the home in exchange for providing a portion of the down payment. When the home is later sold, the... (more...)
A home loan in which the lender gets a share of the equity of the home in exchange for providing a portion of the down payment. When the home is later sold, the lender is entitled to a portion of the proceeds.

HEIR

One who receives property from someone who has died. While the traditional meaning includes only those who had a legal right to the deceased person's property, ... (more...)
One who receives property from someone who has died. While the traditional meaning includes only those who had a legal right to the deceased person's property, modern usage includes anyone who receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

CONTRACT

A legally binding agreement involving two or more people or businesses (called parties) that sets forth what the parties will or will not do. Most contracts tha... (more...)
A legally binding agreement involving two or more people or businesses (called parties) that sets forth what the parties will or will not do. Most contracts that can be carried out within one year can be either oral or written. Major exceptions include contracts involving the ownership of real estate and commercial contracts for goods worth $500 or more, which must be in writing to be enforceable. (See statute of frauds.) A contract is formed when competent parties -- usually adults of sound mind or business entities -- mutually agree to provide each other some benefit (called consideration), such as a promise to pay money in exchange for a promise to deliver specified goods or services or the actual delivery of those goods and services. A contract normally requires one party to make a reasonably detailed offer to do something -- including, typically, the price, time for performance and other essential terms and conditions -- and the other to accept without significant change. For example, if I offer to sell you ten roses for $5 to be delivered next Thursday and you say 'It's a deal,' we've made a valid contract. On the other hand, if one party fails to offer something of benefit to the other, there is no contract. For example, if Maria promises to fix Josh's car, there is no contract unless Josh promises something in return for Maria's services.

TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY

Personal property that can be felt or touched. Examples include furniture, cars, jewelry and artwork. However, cash and checking accounts are not tangible perso... (more...)
Personal property that can be felt or touched. Examples include furniture, cars, jewelry and artwork. However, cash and checking accounts are not tangible personal property. The law is unsettled as to whether computer data is tangible personal property. Compare intangible property.

NONDISCLOSURE AGREEMENT

A legally binding contract in which a person or business promises to treat specific information as a trade secret and not disclose it to others without proper a... (more...)
A legally binding contract in which a person or business promises to treat specific information as a trade secret and not disclose it to others without proper authorization. Nondisclosure agreements are often used when a business discloses a trade secret to another person or business for such purposes as development, marketing, evaluation or securing financial backing. Although nondisclosure agreements are usually in the form of written contracts, they may also be implied if the context of a business relationship suggests that the parties intended to make an agreement. For example, a business that conducts patent searches for inventors is expected to keep information about the invention secret, even if no written agreement is signed, because the nature of the business is to deal in confidential information.

INCIDENTS OF OWNERSHIP

Any control over property. If you give away property but keep an incident of ownership--for example, you give away an apartment building but retain the right to... (more...)
Any control over property. If you give away property but keep an incident of ownership--for example, you give away an apartment building but retain the right to receive rent--then legally, no gift has been made. This distinction can be important if you're making large gifts to reduce your eventual estate tax.

EASEMENT BY PRESCRIPTION

A right to use property, acquired by a long tradition of open and obvious use. For example, if hikers have been using a trail through your backyard for ten year... (more...)
A right to use property, acquired by a long tradition of open and obvious use. For example, if hikers have been using a trail through your backyard for ten years and you've never complained, they probably have an easement by prescription through your yard to the trail.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Andrews v. Wisconsin Public Service Corp.

... 7 Wisconsin courts have long recognized that the right to eminent domain cannot be abrogated by contract. City of Milwaukee v. Schomberg, 261 Wis. ... (citing 1 NICHOLS ON EMINENT DOMAIN 75-76, § 22 (2d ed.1917)). ¶ 9 The rule described in Schomberg remains the law. ...

Buckett v. Jante

... 5 In 2005, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation sought to condemn and purchase the parcel through an eminent domain proceeding for another road construction project. Initially, the DOT looked at Racine county's records and thought Buckett owned the property. ...

City of Milwaukee v. Redevelopment Auth.

... We begin our analysis with a brief review of the history of the unit rule. ¶ 9 The unit rule "requires that real estate be valued in respect to its gross value as a single entity as if there was only one owner." 4-13 NICHOLS, EMINENT DOMAIN § 13.01[16] § 13-28. ...