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Bangor Divorce Lawyer, Maine


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Steven T. Blackwell

Personal Injury, Litigation, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Kaylee J. Folster

Criminal, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

James C. Munch

Criminal, Bankruptcy, Electronic Commerce, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Eugene M. Sullivan

Criminal, Divorce, Sexual Harassment, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years
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Jane S. E. Clayton

Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Jeremiah F. Haley

Divorce, Deportation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Charles W. Cox

Real Estate, Litigation, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Christina B. Perkins

Real Estate, Family Law, Divorce, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Martha Novy-Broderick

Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Divorce, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Martha A. Novy-Broderick

Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Divorce, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.