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Bismarck Child Custody Lawyer, North Dakota


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

TaLisa Ann Nemec Lawyer

TaLisa Ann Nemec

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts

TaLisa is an attorney located in Mandan, ND. Are you struggling to take care of your child with the current child support payments that you are receiv... (more)

Norlyn E. Schulz

Conveyancing, Elder Law, Gift Taxation, Estate Administration, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Geiermann

Education, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory C. Larson

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Workers' Compensation, Social Security
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Norlyn E. Schulz

Car Accident, Slip & Fall Accident, Elder Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  49 Years

David Michael Knoll

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Marvin M. Hager

Criminal, Paternity, Federal Appellate Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Patricia Garrity

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Deborah Lozano

Personal Injury, Family Law, Entertainment, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.
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