Brookston Family Law Lawyer, Minnesota


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Keith M Carlson

Landlord-Tenant, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Jessica Lynn Sterle

Juvenile Law, Paternity, Divorce, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Matthew Henry Beaumier

Commercial Real Estate, Litigation, Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Amy Hunt Kuronen

Commercial Real Estate, Estate, Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years
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Andrew Tiegs Poole

Military, Family Law, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Brookston Family Law Lawyers and Brookston Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Do v. American Family Mut. Ins. Co.

... 548.251. When the underlying facts of a case are undisputed, an appellate court will review de novo the district court's application of the law. Dean v. Am. Family Mut. Ins. Co., 535 NW2d 342, 343 (Minn.1995). Here, the underlying facts are not disputed. ...

Peterka v. Dennis

... Mary Catherine Lauhead, Law Offices of Mary Catherine Lauhead, St. Paul, Minnesota; Michael D. Dittberner, Clugg, Linder, Dittberner & Bryant, Ltd., Edina, Minnesota; Cheryl M. Prince, Hanft Fride, PA, Duluth, Minnesota; and Joan H. Lucas, Lucas Family Law, LLC, St. ...

Langston v. Wilson McShane Corp.

... Divorce law and domestic relations law are traditionally matters of state concern. ... See 29 USC § 1056(d)(1) (2006). Thus, the rights a former spouse or dependent may claim under a QDRO arise, not under ERISA, but under state domestic relations law and the terms of the plan. ...