North York Family Law Lawyer, Ontario


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Christopher  Achkar Lawyer

Christopher Achkar

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Employment, Business, Civil & Human Rights

Christopher works with both employees and employers regarding all their employment law needs, including human rights and business litigation issues. ... (more)

Michael  Deverett Lawyer

Michael Deverett

Litigation, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Full service law firm with focus on estate and family litigation

Deverett Law Offices provides full legal services. Since 1984, we have assisted our clients with estate and family litigation, estate administration, ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-854-2281

Ngozi  Iwuoha Lawyer

Ngozi Iwuoha

VERIFIED
Immigration, Divorce & Family Law

Law Office of Ngozi Iwuoha provides legal services to clients on Immigration and Family Law matters. Our Immigration Attorney and Family Lawyer endeav... (more)

Angela B. Mbuagbaw Lawyer

Angela B. Mbuagbaw

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Real Estate

Angela Mbuagbaw proudly serves Toronto, ON and the neighboring communities in the areas of Divorce and Family Law, Immigration, and Real Estate law.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

647-346-7770

Salvatore  Grillo Lawyer

Salvatore Grillo

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Car Accident, Wrongful Death
Strategic, Determined & Trial-Ready

After graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School and briefly exploring a partnership with former classmates, Salvatore Grillo recognized his passion for ... (more)

Jillian Micole Siskind Lawyer

Jillian Micole Siskind

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Administrative Law, Real Estate, Litigation, Construction

Jillian Siskind graduated from Simon Fraser University in 1996 with a B.A., the University of Ottawa in 2000 with an LL.B / J.D (cum laude). She then ... (more)

John  Dadzie Lawyer

John Dadzie

VERIFIED
Immigration, Divorce & Family Law, Business

John Dadzie is a practicing lawyer in the province of Ontario.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-908-2711

Barbara Kristanic

Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeremy Diamond

Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher Harley Bird

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, Custody & Visitation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.