Saskatchewan Child Support Lawyer List


Madlin Marie Lucyk Lawyer

Madlin Marie Lucyk

Regina Child Support Lawyer

Joanne Carol Moser

Estate, Criminal, Civil Rights, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Kaylea Gael Lax

Divorce & Family Law, Corporate, Elder Law, Commercial Real Estate, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Heather Dawn Macmillan-Brown

Immigration, Wills & Probate, Wrongful Termination, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Jan Durston Katerynych

Family Law, Commercial Real Estate, Federal, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Michelle Noella Cholowsky

Divorce & Family Law, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

David George Mackay

Divorce & Family Law, Commercial Real Estate, Wills, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  51 Years

Kenneth John Brodt

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Income Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Angela Marie Eagle

Litigation, Adoption, Commercial Real Estate, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Gregory Matthew Kuse

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Saskatchewan Child Support Lawyers and Saskatchewan Child Support Law Firms for your location. Narrow your Child Support attorney search for Saskatchewan by major city or a specific Saskatchewan city using the city list. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Divorce and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

ADULTERY

Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are ra... (more...)
Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are rarely prosecuted for it. In states that have retained fault grounds for divorce, adultery is always sufficient grounds for a divorce. In addition, some states alter the distribution of property between divorcing spouses in cases of adultery, giving less to the 'cheating' spouse.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

COMPLAINT

Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states a... (more...)
Papers filed with a court clerk by the plaintiff to initiate a lawsuit by setting out facts and legal claims (usually called causes of action). In some states and in some types of legal actions, such as divorce, complaints are called petitions and the person filing is called the petitioner. To complete the initial stage of a lawsuit, the plaintiff's complaint must be served on the defendant, who then has the opportunity to respond by filing an answer. In practice, few lawyers prepare complaints from scratch. Instead they use -- and sometimes modify -- pre-drafted complaints widely available in form books.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.