Charleston Estate Planning Lawyer, South Carolina


Includes: Gift Taxation

Roger Scott Dixon Lawyer

Roger Scott Dixon

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Administration, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning

Roger Dixon is the founder and managing attorney of Dixon Law Firm, LLC. His practice includes family law, criminal defense, general civil litigation,... (more)

D. Nathan Davis

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brendan P Langendorfer

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jon A. Wallace

Corporate, Estate Planning, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Evan Guthrie

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

John A. Massalon

Premises Liability, Estate Planning, Partnerships, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Alan D Toporek

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

William S. Barr

Construction, Estate Planning, Criminal, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher Santino Inglese

Divorce, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Donald H. Howe

Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Charleston Estate Planning Lawyers and Charleston Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

QTIP TRUST

A type of trust for wealthy married couples that allows a surviving spouse to postpone estate taxes. A QTIP trust allows the surviving spouse to make use of the... (more...)
A type of trust for wealthy married couples that allows a surviving spouse to postpone estate taxes. A QTIP trust allows the surviving spouse to make use of the trust property tax-free. Taxes are deferred until the surviving spouse dies and the trust property is received by the final trust beneficiaries, who were named by the first spouse to die.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Rydde v. Morris

... Knight to prepare her estate plan. Morris provided Knight with an estate planning questionnaire. Knight returned the estate planning questionnaire to Morris on Thursday, September 22, 2005. Appellants Robert A. Rydde and ...

Gibson v. Bank of America, NA

... widow of Mitchell's nephew. Within a few weeks after Mitchell's arrival in South Carolina, Gibson contacted her estate planning attorney to inquire about estate planning services for Mitchell, who was very affluent. As a result ...

In re Dahle

... O. In or about 1991, Ms. McKinney and her husband obtained estate-planning documents. Ms. McKinney's husband died in 1992. P. On December 4, 1995, Ms. McKinney consulted with Respondent to have him review her estate planning. ...