Charleston Estate Planning Lawyer, South Carolina


Includes: Gift Taxation

Roger Scott Dixon Lawyer

Roger Scott Dixon

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Administration, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning

Roger Dixon is the founder and managing attorney of Dixon Law Firm, LLC. His practice includes family law, criminal defense, general civil litigation,... (more)

W. Forrest Keels Lawyer

W. Forrest Keels

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning

W. Forrest Keels is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-874-1021

D. Nathan Davis

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brendan P Langendorfer

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Jon A. Wallace

Corporate, Estate Planning, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           

Evan Guthrie

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

John A. Massalon

Premises Liability, Estate Planning, Partnerships, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Alan D Toporek

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Christopher Santino Inglese

Divorce, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Donald H. Howe

Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Charleston Estate Planning Lawyers and Charleston Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

GRANT DEED

A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as descri... (more...)
A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as described in the deed. This is the most commonly used type of deed. Compare quitclaim deed.

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

LETTERS TESTAMENTARY

The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succes... (more...)
The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succession laws.

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.

CONSERVATOR

Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of th... (more...)
Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of the estate.' One who takes care of personal matters, such as healthcare and living arrangements, is known as a 'conservator of the person.' Sometimes, one conservator is appointed to handle all these tasks. Depending on where you live, a conservator may also be called a guardian, committee or curator.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Rydde v. Morris

... Knight to prepare her estate plan. Morris provided Knight with an estate planning questionnaire. Knight returned the estate planning questionnaire to Morris on Thursday, September 22, 2005. Appellants Robert A. Rydde and ...

Gibson v. Bank of America, NA

... widow of Mitchell's nephew. Within a few weeks after Mitchell's arrival in South Carolina, Gibson contacted her estate planning attorney to inquire about estate planning services for Mitchell, who was very affluent. As a result ...

In re Dahle

... O. In or about 1991, Ms. McKinney and her husband obtained estate-planning documents. Ms. McKinney's husband died in 1992. P. On December 4, 1995, Ms. McKinney consulted with Respondent to have him review her estate planning. ...

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