Clinton DUI-DWI Lawyer, Connecticut


Bradford J Sullivan Lawyer

Bradford J Sullivan

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Car Accident, Animal Bite, Misdemeanor
Attorneys as counselors providing objective advice for reasonable fees.

Brad is a founding member of the firm. He is admitted to practice in Connecticut and New York as well as the corresponding federal courts for both sta... (more)

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860-664-4440

Bruce W. Diamond Lawyer

Bruce W. Diamond

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Personal Injury, Car Accident, DUI-DWI
Taking great care of our clients for over 30 years.

Attorney Bruce W. Diamond received his B.A. in government from St. Lawrence University in 1982, and graduated from UCONN School of Law in 1985. He was... (more)

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800-931-8520

Ronald F Stevens

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Environmental Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tina L. Case

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years
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Robert James Weber, III

Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Robert James Weber

Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Jeremy Taylor

Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Real Estate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

PUBLIC DEFENDER

A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and ar... (more...)
A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and are unable to pay for their own defense.

HOT PURSUIT

An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and a... (more...)
An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and an officer has chased a suspect to a private house, the officer can forcefully enter the house in order to prevent the suspect from escaping or hiding or destroying evidence.

AGGRAVATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, th... (more...)
Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, the crime of aggravated assault is a physical attack made worse because it is committed with a dangerous weapon, results in severe bodily injury or is made in conjunction with another serious crime. Aggravated assault is usually considered a felony, punishable by a prison sentence.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

BURDEN OF PROOF

A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convi... (more...)
A party's job of convincing the decisionmaker in a trial that the party's version of the facts is true. In a civil trial, it means that the plaintiff must convince the judge or jury 'by a preponderance of the evidence' that the plaintiff's version is true -- that is, over 50% of the believable evidence is in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, because a person's liberty is at stake, the government has a harder job, and must convince the judge or jury beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Fontaine

... 919, 883 A.2d 1246 (2005). [4] During his examination by the state, Abely testified that when Roberts asked the defendant for his operator's license, the defendant replied, "[y]ou don't need a license to operate a moped . . . give me a break, I just got out on a DWI offense . . . ...

State v. Fontaine

... 919, 883 A.2d 1246 (2005). [4] During his examination by the state, Abely testified that when Roberts asked the defendant for his operator's license, the defendant replied, "[y]ou don't need a license to operate a moped ... give me a break, I just got out on a DWI offense ... ...