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Cookeville Divorce Lawyer, Tennessee


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Martelia T. Crawford

Family Law, Civil Rights, Antitrust, Constitutional Law, Collaborative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark Tribble

Insurance, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Nursing Home
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Knowlton

Family Law, Juvenile Law, Federal Appellate Practice, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Michael H Knowlton

Family Law, Juvenile Law, Federal Appellate Practice, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years
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Gordon Allen Byars

Civil Rights, Criminal, Family Law, Federal Appellate Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

Ashley Edgar Waters

Elder Law, Family Law, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gayla Hendrix

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Immigration
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Kelsy Miller

Administrative Law, Trusts, Family Law, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Kelsy Austin Miller

Administrative Law, Trusts, Family Law, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Steven Qualls

Commercial Real Estate, Family Law, Federal Appellate Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Blackburn v. Blackburn

... open court that they had reached a divorce settlement. We hold that the record does not support a finding that the trial court granted the parties a divorce that day. ... erred in entering a divorce decree nunc pro tunc. Grounds for Divorce. ...

Larsen-Ball v. Ball

... This case requires us to construe Tennessee Code Annotated section 36-4-121(b)(1)(A) to determine whether a $17 million attorney fee acquired by Husband after Wife filed a complaint for divorce but before the final divorce hearing is "marital property" and therefore subject to ...

Pruitt v. Pruitt

... Husband appeals the finding that he was in willful contempt of the Final Decree of Divorce and the Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO), which were entered at the time of the parties' divorce in 1997, pursuant to which, inter alia, Wife was to be designated as the ...