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Davidson County, NC Divorce & Family Law Lawyers


John Alexander Hauser

Criminal, Family Law, Personal Injury, Social Security -- Disability, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Jerry B. Grimes

Adoption, Child Support, Criminal, Farms, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

D. Linwood Bunce

Adoption, Child Support, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Danielle Deangelis

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Scott B Lewis

Employment, Bankruptcy, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Roger S. Tripp

Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Timothy D. Smith

Criminal, Corporate, Civil Rights, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Danielle De Angelis

Divorce, Juvenile Law, Family Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.