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Grand Junction Child Custody Lawyer, Colorado


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Gregory G Leavitt

Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

James W Giese

Corporate, Collection, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Trudee A. Gurley

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gerald B Feather

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Child Support, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Roy Keswick Farber

Family Law, Divorce, Prosecution, Custody & Visitation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carisa Acker

International Other, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Status:  In Good Standing           

James William Giese

Family Law, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Brittany Vick

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brittany Vick

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lance Phillip Timbreza

Civil Rights, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

GUARDIAN

An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a '... (more...)
An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a 'guardian of the estate.' An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical and educational needs, is called a 'guardian of the person.' Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re LS

... The only explanation for the dismissal was that "the State of Nebraska has jurisdiction over the matter." The minute order made no reference to child custody. ... We conclude the Adams County District Court never declined child custody jurisdiction on inconvenient forum grounds. ...

PEOPLE EX REL. DP

... The UCCJEA addresses whether a Colorado court or a non-Colorado court has jurisdiction in child custody proceedings. See §§ 14-13-101 to -403. ... 423, 425, 535 P.2d 1122, 1123 (1975)(trial judges sitting in trial courts have discretion to make child custody determinations). ...

In re MJK

... Id. Modification statutes, on the other hand, do not do so, because "[i]n the modification context, the State has a compelling interest to protect the child's need for stability and to prevent constant litigation in child custody cases." Id. ...