Greenville Child Custody Lawyer, Missouri


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Benjamin Eugene Thompson

Municipal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Grace C. Blaich

Motor Vehicle, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

C. Wade Pierce

Workers' Compensation, Adoption, Corporate, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer R. Williams

Wills, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Stephen Walsh

Divorce, Criminal, Wrongful Death, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert Lee Smith

Education, Immigration, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

John Albright

Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Janet K. Brown

Social Security, Family Law, Elder Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

Christopher L. Yarbro

Traffic, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Luke Matthew Henson

Traffic, Wills & Probate, Employment Discrimination, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

JCW ex rel. Webb v. Wyciskalla

... Section 452.455.4 provides that a parent who owes more than $10,000 in child support arrearage must post bond for the amount of child support due, or the custodial parents' attorney fees, before filing a motion for modification of child custody or support. ...

Hightower v. Myers

... PATRICIA BRECKENRIDGE, Judge. Melissa Ann Myers (Mother) appeals from a 2007 judgment modifying the child custody and support provisions for the parties' child. ... See Pirisky, 176 SW3d at 147; UNIF. CHILD CUSTODY JURISDICTION ACT § 1, 9 ULA 124 (1968). ...

In re Marriage of Wood

... III. Analysis. Issue 1: Child Custody— Guardian ad litem. ... Husband's first point is denied. Issue Two: Child Custody—Best Interests Determination. Husband next argues the trial court erred in failing to consider all evidence relating to the best interests of the children. ...