Hackensack RICO Act Lawyer, New Jersey

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Adam M. Lustberg Lawyer

Adam M. Lustberg

Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime, RICO Act

Attorney Adam M. Lustberg focuses his practice on the defense of those being investigated for or accused of crimes. His passion for criminal defense b... (more)

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201-880-5311

Jeffrey B. Steinfeld Lawyer

Jeffrey B. Steinfeld

Immigration, Criminal, Juvenile Law

Mr. Steinfeld is an honors graduate of John Hopkins University and received his law degree from Boston University School of Law in 1985. He is admitte... (more)

Ron  Bar-Nadav Lawyer

Ron Bar-Nadav

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, White Collar Crime, State Appellate Practice

Bar-Nadav Law Offices is a legal service in Hackensack, NJ specializing in criminal law cases. With years of experience in NJ criminal law, we’re co... (more)

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800-278-3910

Alan G. Peyrouton Lawyer

Alan G. Peyrouton

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Motor Vehicle, Divorce & Family Law, Immigration

Attorney Alan G. Peyrouton is from Ridgewood, NJ. After graduating from Ridgewood High School, Mr. Peyrouton accepted an athletic scholarship to at... (more)

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201-766-4800

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Kevin Timothy Conway Lawyer

Kevin Timothy Conway

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Traffic

The undersigned previously served as the County Wide STOP DWI prosecutor supervising all of the DWI cases/dispositions while also handling all other t... (more)

Henry G. Klein

Criminal, Bankruptcy Litigation, Bankruptcy, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jennifer M. Mendelsohn

Landlord-Tenant, Traffic, Criminal, Accident & Injury
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Peter C. Polidoro

Criminal, DUI-DWI, State and Local, Traffic
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Marc E. Leibman

Land Use & Zoning, Real Estate, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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James B. Seplowitz

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Felony
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Call me for fastest results!
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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

CRIMINAL CASE

A lawsuit brought by a prosecutor employed by the federal, state or local government that charges a person with the commission of a crime.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

PROSECUTE

When a local District Attorney, state Attorney General or federal United States Attorney brings a criminal case against a defendant.