Layton Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Utah

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Lorraine P. Brown

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Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute

In 1955, C.S. Lewis surmised in a letter to Mrs. Johnson, that motherhood is "the job for which all others exist." If motherhood is the ultimate purp... (more)

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Stephen Knowlton

Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Adoption, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Kenneth Burton

Child Support, Collection, Construction, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kyle D. Hoskins

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
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Michael S Edwards

Family Law, White Collar Crime, Insurance, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel G Shumway

Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Juvenile Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Jason F Barnes

Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Non-profit
Status:  In Good Standing           

Charles R Ahlstrom

Juvenile Law, Mediation, Child Custody, Gay & Lesbian Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Melinda Checketts Hibbert

Employment, Family Law, Litigation, Mediation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Michael D. Murphy

Farms, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.