Lincoln Criminal Lawyer, Nebraska


John S. Berry Lawyer

John S. Berry

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Criminal, Accident & Injury, Military, Real Estate, Estate

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. In the last year I have had m... (more)

Timothy P. Sullivan Lawyer

Timothy P. Sullivan

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Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Immigration, Accident & Injury
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Timothy Sullivan is a lawyer based in Lincoln, NE who can assist with criminal defense, family law, immigration, and more. Lawyer.com Member Que... (more)

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800-866-1901

Perry  Pirsch Lawyer

Perry Pirsch

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Business, Estate, Criminal, Employment, Accident & Injury

Perry A. Pirsch, the founder of Pirsch Legal Services, has 20 years in the practice of law. Pirsch has an extensive background in business law, employ... (more)

Thomas T. Inkelaar Lawyer

Thomas T. Inkelaar

Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Personal Injury, Slip & Fall Accident, Criminal

Thomas Inkelaar is a lawyer in Lincoln who focuses on Personal Injury cases and more.

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Perry  Pirsch Lawyer

Perry Pirsch

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Business, Estate Planning, Criminal, Employment, Accident & Injury
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Perry A. Pirsch, the founder of Pirsch Legal Services, has 20 years in the practice of law. Pirsch has an extensive background in business law, employ... (more)

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800-898-2980

Andrew J. Wilson Lawyer

Andrew J. Wilson

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Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Wrongful Death

Andy is an Omaha native joining Carlson and Burnett as a partner with over 25 years of criminal and civil litigation experience. He began his career i... (more)

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800-919-3730

Perry  Pirsch Lawyer

Perry Pirsch

VERIFIED
Business, Estate, Criminal, Employment, Accident & Injury

Perry A. Pirsch, the founder of Pirsch Legal Services, has 20 years in the practice of law. Pirsch has an extensive background in business law, employ... (more)

James L. Beckmann

Criminal, Corporate, DUI-DWI, Divorce
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Randall L Wertz

Criminal, Divorce, Landlord-Tenant, Personal Injury
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Franklin Miner

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Car Accident, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

INFORMATION

The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or ... (more...)
The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or a misdemeanor. The information tells the defendant what crime he is charged with, against whom and when the offense allegedly occurred, but the prosecutor is not obliged to go into great detail. If the defendant wants more specifics, he must ask for it by way of a discovery request. Compare indictment.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

INTERROGATION

A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligat... (more...)
A term that describes vigorous questioning, usually by the police of a suspect in custody. Other than providing his name and address, the suspect is not obligated to answer the questions, and the fact that he has remained silent generally cannot be used by the prosecution to help prove that he is guilty of a crime. If the suspect has asked for a lawyer, the police must cease questioning. If they do not, they cannot use the answers against the suspect at trial.

IRRESISTIBLE IMPULSE TEST

A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his ac... (more...)
A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his actions were wrong.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Draganescu

... He asked Truesdale about his travels and his criminal and driving history. ... At 9:58 am, the dispatcher reported that there were no outstanding warrants and that Truesdale's license was valid. The dispatcher also reported that Draganescu had a drug-related criminal history. ...

State v. Branch

... The sentences were ordered to be served concurrently. Branch appeals. SCOPE OF REVIEW. [1,2] When reviewing a criminal conviction for sufficiency of the evidence to sustain the conviction, the relevant question for an appellate court is whether, after viewing the evidence in ...

State v. Davis

... When reviewing a criminal conviction for sufficiency of the evidence to sustain the conviction, the relevant question for an appellate court is whether, after viewing the evidence in the light most favorable to the prosecution, any rational trier of fact could have found the essential ...