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Louisa Estate Lawyer, Virginia


Allison  Bridges Lawyer

Allison Bridges

Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Wills & Probate, Juvenile Law

Allison L. Bridges, Esq. practices in the areas of family law, including divorce, custody, and visitation, as well as criminal and traffic defense, an... (more)

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Charles Jerry Homiller Lawyer

Charles Jerry Homiller

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Wills
Criminal and Civil Litigation

The Homiller Law Firm is located in in Midlothian, Virginia, fifteen minutes west of Richmond. Our central Virginia location enables us to reach court... (more)

Gail D Holstrom Lawyer

Gail D Holstrom

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Real Estate, Litigation, Corporate

I personally handle all aspects of each clients' case from the initial consultation to trial. I take great pride in the personal attention I am able t... (more)

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800-852-2660

Charles L. Weber

Business Organization, Family Law, Corporate, Constitutional Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Hugh Sheppard Campbell

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Transportation & Shipping, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robin S. Gnatowsky

Business Organization, Business Successions, Dissolution, Elder Law, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Harris W. Leiner

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Susan E. Allen

Collection, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Phoebe P. Hall

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Wills, Divorce, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Franklin P. Hall

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Wills, Divorce, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Louisa Estate Lawyers and Louisa Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

INTER VIVOS TRUST

The Latin name, favored by some lawyers, for a living trust. 'Inter vivos' is Latin for 'between the living.'

BENEFICIARY

A person or organization legally entitled to receive benefits through a legal device, such as a will, trust or life insurance policy.

POUR-OVER WILL

A will that 'pours over' property into a trust when the will maker dies. Property left through the will must go through probate before it goes into the trust.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

SPRINKLING TRUST

A trust that gives the person managing it (the trustee) the discretion to disburse its funds among the beneficiaries in any way he or she sees fit.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

CREDIT SHELTER TRUST

See AB trust.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Estate of James v. Peyton

In these consolidated interlocutory appeals arising from a personal injury action, we consider whether the circuit court erred in concluding that an amended motion for judgment properly names an administrator of an estate rather than the estate itself as a party defendant. Specifically, ...

Idoux v. Estate of Helou

On September 2, 2008, Idoux filed the present negligence action in the circuit court and identified the defendant as the "Estate of Raja Alexander Helou." On November 17, 2008, Idoux served the personal representative of the Estate with the complaint, after the relevant statute of ...

Williams v. COM., REAL ESTATE BOARD

The underlying facts in this matter are highly contested, and rather convoluted. In the fall of 2004, Williams was a licensed real estate agent working for Virginia Real Estate and Development, Inc. (VARED). On December 8, 2004, Williams entered into an agreement ...