Manchester Estate Lawyer, New Hampshire


Robert M. Moore

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Craig Donais

Real Estate, Estate, Business, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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Kirk Simoneau

Trusts, Workers' Compensation, Personal Injury, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

George Campbell

Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Business & Trade, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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John Bentas

Securities, Employee Rights, Gift Taxation, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher R. Paul

Estate Planning, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Peter B. Rotch

Banking & Finance, Land Use & Zoning, Wills & Probate, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rolf E. Goodwin

Banking & Finance, International Trade, Land Use & Zoning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

John E. Rich

Health Care Other, Estate Planning, Pension & Benefits, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard Thorner

Civil Rights, Family Law, Trusts, Affirmative Action
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

TESTAMENTARY TRUST

A trust created by a will, effective only upon the death of the willmaker.

FINAL BENEFICIARY

The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jan... (more...)
The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jane receives income for the duration of her life. Their daughter, the final beneficiary, receives the trust principal after Jane's death.

PREDECEASED SPOUSE

In the law of wills, a spouse who dies before the will maker while still married to him or her.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

BYPASS TRUST

A trust designed to lessen a family's overall estate tax liability. An AB trust is the most popular kind of bypass trust.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.