Neapolis Adoption Lawyer, Ohio


Daniel Patrick Mcquade

Agriculture, Family Law, Banking & Finance, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alan J. Lehenbauer

Personal Injury, Bankruptcy, Divorce, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christine Marie Smith

Real Estate, Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Colin J. Mcquade

Insurance, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Colin Joseph Mcquade

Corporate, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Gregory Lynn Van Gunten

Estate, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Michael Andrew Dzienny

Litigation, Family Law, Corporate, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Neapolis Adoption Lawyers and Neapolis Adoption Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Adoption of PAC

{¶ 1} Kevin Michael Crooks appeals from the judgment of the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas, Probate Division, dismissing his petition to adopt his stepdaughter, PAC The probate court dismissed the adoption petition after determining that the adoption required the consent ...

In re Adoption of SRA

{¶ 5} A hearing was held before a magistrate on August 17, 2009, at which appellee and appellant both testified. Appellant testified that he had received a phone call from HA in 2005 notifying him that she was approximately three or four weeks pregnant. Appellant believed that he ...

In re TR

... 19, 2001), Madison App. No. CA2000-06-37, 2001 WL 277245, on the following issue: "Does RC 2151.413(E) require a children services board to file an adoption plan with the court, prior to the court granting permanent custody of a minor child?". ...