Novi Divorce Lawyer, Michigan

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Symantha L. Heath Lawyer
Symantha L. Heath
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Symantha L. Heath

Symantha L. Heath is a Top Attorney Award winner at Attorney.com. Only 5% have the elite qualifications. Click the badge for more info.
VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody, Alimony & Spousal Support, Collaborative Law
Specialist in Divorce & Family Law

Susan Elkouri and Symantha Heath practice exclusively in the areas of divorce, family, and matrimonial law. They have developed a reputation not only ... (more)

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Kenneth D. Clayton Lawyer

Kenneth D. Clayton

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Workers' Compensation, Social Security -- Disability, Divorce, Social Security

Kenneth Clayton is a practicing lawyer in the state of Michigan.

Rebecca Tooman

Dispute Resolution, Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel B. Felder

Family Law, Traffic, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Dayna P. Erbe-Cristofori

Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Theodore M. Takesian

Deportation, Family Law, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Rebecca Suzanne Tooman

Dispute Resolution, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Daniel D. Mclean

Employee Rights, Divorce, Contract, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Ryan M. Kelly

Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mathew Kobliska

Litigation, Dispute Resolution, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Berger v. Berger

... Defendant appeals by right a judgment of divorce entered after a six-day trial. ... We do not agree with defendant's argument that MCL 552.9(1) requires plaintiff's continuing physical presence in Jackson County for the 10 days immediately preceding filing for divorce. ...

Estes v. Titus

... [9]. III. THE UFTA'S APPLICATION TO PROPERTY SETTLEMENTS IN DIVORCE CASES. In her appeal, Swabash argues ... a transfer. IV. UFTA RELIEF AND COLLATERAL ATTACKS ON DIVORCE JUDGMENTS. The dissenting judge ...

Thornton v. Thornton

... On September 14, 1993, the trial court entered the parties' consent judgment of divorce. The judgment of divorce provided that defendant must pay permanent alimony of $125 a week to plaintiff until further order of the court. In addition, the judgment of divorce provided: Plaintiff . ...