Olmsted Falls Child Support Lawyer, Ohio

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John David Zalic Lawyer

John David Zalic

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Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Divorce, dissolution, custody, juvenile, & family law representation in Cuyahoga & NE Ohio

Attorney John Zalic has been practicing law for over 25 years. Previously he worked as a mediator for the Prosecutor's office and performed law enforc... (more)

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Stephen E. Daray

Child Support, Criminal, Farms, Divorce
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Eric R. Laubacher

Child Support, Adoption, Business Organization, Bankruptcy
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Cara L. Santosuosso

Age Discrimination, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
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Darlene A. Wilcox

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption, Children's Rights
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LEGAL TERMS

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Byrd v. Knuckles

... Theresa B. Ellison and Gayle A. Walker, for appellee Clermont County Department of Job and Family Services, Division of Child Support Enforcement. ... Greg Sauer and Brian J. Davidson, urging reversal for amicus curiae Butler County Child Support Enforcement Agency. ...

Rosen v. Celebrezze

... custody of the parties' three minor children. Kathleen later filed an amended complaint for divorce, spousal support, child support, attorney fees, allocation of parental rights and responsibilities, and further legal and equitable relief. ...

Moore v. Moore

... {¶ 56} "IV. The trial court committed prejudicial error by ordering husband to purchase an annuity in lieu of periodic payments for child support. ... 19 {¶ 73} "(viii) The age and special needs of the child for whom child support is being calculated under this section; ...