Palmer Trusts Lawyer, Alaska


Kenneth D. Albertsen

Real Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Child Support, Civil Rights, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Sean Matthew Owens

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  26 Years

Eric D. Conard

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Glen Price

Business
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Daniel Cheyette

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  24 Years

Ross A. Kopperud

Wrongful Termination
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nancy Driscoll Stroup

Lawsuit & Dispute, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Hugh White

General Practice
Status:  Suspended           Licensed:  62 Years

Helene M. Antel

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Noel H. Kopperud

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Palmer Trusts Lawyers and Palmer Trusts Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Estate Planning, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

WARRANTY DEED

A seldom-used type of deed that contains express assurances about the legal validity of the title being transferred.

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

PUBLISHED WORK

An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public o... (more...)
An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public on an unrestricted basis. It is thus possible to display a work, or distribute it with restrictions on disclosure of its contents, without actually 'publishing' it. Both published and unpublished works are entitled to copyright protection, but some of the rules differ.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Gottstein v. Kraft

... Jim and Terrie set up reciprocal revocable trusts in 1995 as part of their estate planning process. The couple decided that in order for both trusts to contain a substantial amount of assets, the Alpine Woods property would be placed in Terrie's trust. ...

WASSER & WINTERS v. RITCHIE BROS. AUCTION.

... $331,078.55. Before sending the check, Ritchie discovered various loggers' pension trusts that were claiming a priority interest in approximately $450,000 of the proceeds of the sale of all of Thomas's auctioned equipment. The ...

IN RE ESTATE OF FIELDS

... [16]. It is true that probate matters are governed generally by probate statutes and rules, but a probate statute specifically provides that the court, meaning the superior court, [17] "has jurisdiction over all subject matter relating to" decedents' estates and trusts "[t]o the full extent ...