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Paulding County, GA Child Support Lawyers


Jeanne O'Halleran

Divorce, Adoption, Family Law, Wills & Probate, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Allen Turner

Bankruptcy, Personal Injury, Family Law, Criminal, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mitchell Lawrence Freehauf

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Dean Carlos Bucci

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Jon Loren Weinberg

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Jana L. Evans

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Judge Sandra W. Miller

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Suzanne Elizabeth Henrickson

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Noelani Gardner Skipper

Family Law, Government, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Hamlin v. Ramey

... In a subsequent order, the court determined the amount of child support and set out findings as required by OCGA § 19-6-15(c)(2). Hamlin appeals the child support order, contending the trial court erred in failing to grant him a deviation from the presumptive amount of child ...

Turner v. Turner

... Husband also agreed to pay wife $11,000 representing her interest in the marital residence. Left unresolved and submitted to the trial court for determination were issues of child support and the division of extracurricular expenses. ...

Spurlock v. Department of Human Resources

... Pursuant to the final divorce decree, Father was ordered to pay monthly child support of $1,063. Three years later, he initiated a review of that child support order by the Department of Human Resources (DHR) pursuant to OCGA § 19-11-12. ...