Pawtucket Estate Lawyer, Rhode Island

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Christopher M. Lefebvre Lawyer

Christopher M. Lefebvre

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy & Debt, Estate, Consumer Rights, Defect and Lemon Law

Christopher M. Lefebvre, Esq. practices family, bankruptcy and consumer protection law with his father in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Chris is a member o... (more)

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800-961-2590

David L. Graham Lawyer

David L. Graham

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Foreclosure

Since 1982, Attorney Graham has represented clients in many diverse areas of the law. He has represented hundreds of clients in the area of consumer b... (more)

James T. Marasco Lawyer

James T. Marasco

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

At The Law Offices of James T. Marasco, we can guide you on the road to a better future through personal injury, bankruptcy and Social Security Disabi... (more)

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401-421-7500

Patrick F. Dowling Lawyer

Patrick F. Dowling

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Estate, Criminal, Business, Real Estate
Admitted in RI, MA, RI Federal, 1st Circuit Court of Appeals

Patrick Dowling, Jr. is a Partner at D’Amico · Burchfield with a broad range of experience and demonstrated success in a number of different practi... (more)

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401-454-1212

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J. Katherine  Scott Lawyer

J. Katherine Scott

Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate, Elder Law
Scott & Handwerger, LLP, is a boutique estate planning and estate settlement firm.

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401-654-6770

Charles H. White

Business Organization, Contract, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard H. Gregory

Estate, Trusts, Tax, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Anthony R. Mignanelli

Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas Madden

Credit & Debt, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Katherine Scott

Estate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

SURVIVING SPOUSE'S TRUST

If a couple has created an AB trust, the revocable living trust (Trust B) of the surviving spouse, after the first spouse has died.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.