Pierre Criminal Lawyer, South Dakota


Joan E. Powell Lawyer

Joan E. Powell

VERIFIED
Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate

My goal is to provide the best legal advice you can get, and to be available when you need to speak to an attorney--your attorney.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-364-7161

Katie J Thompson Lawyer

Katie J Thompson

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate

Experienced Criminal Law Attorney; Former Prosecutor

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-871-7830

Brad A. Schreiber Lawyer

Brad A. Schreiber

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Litigation, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury

Mr. Schreiber is a former police officer and graduate of the USD School of Law (1988). He served as a law clerk in the First Judicial Circuit in 1988-... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

605-494-3004

Robert D. Hofer

Litigation, Personal Injury, Estate Planning, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Ronald D. Olinger

Criminal, Personal Injury, Family Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lindsey L. Riter-Rapp

Criminal, Litigation, Family Law, Legislative Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Justin Lee Bell

Criminal, Civil & Human Rights, Administrative Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jamie L. Damon

Criminal, Trusts, Business & Trade, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard H. Wendt

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

DIRECTED VERDICT

A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the... (more...)
A ruling by a judge, typically made after the plaintiff has presented all of her evidence but before the defendant puts on his case, that awards judgment to the defendant. A directed verdict is usually made because the judge concludes the plaintiff has failed to offer the minimum amount of evidence to prove her case even if there were no opposition. In other words, the judge is saying that, as a matter of law, no reasonable jury could decide in the plaintiff's favor. In a criminal case, a directed verdict is a judgement of acquittal for the defendant.

CONSTABLE

A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers and keep t... (more...)
A peace officer for a particular geographic area -- most often a rural county -- who commonly has the power to serve legal papers, arrest lawbreakers and keep the peace. Depending on the state, a constable may be similar to a marshal or sheriff.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Tiede v. CorTrust Bank, NA

... III. [¶7.] Tiede alleges that she was discharged in retaliation for her refusal to discontinue filing SARs and CTRs on certain CorTrust customers. She contends that as the bank secrecy officer, she was required to file these reports or risk criminal prosecution under the BSA. ...

State v. Hayen

... We have recognized that the Fourth Amendment permits a brief investigatory stop of a vehicle when "the officer's action is supported by reasonable suspicion to believe that criminal activity `may be afoot.'" State v. Kenyon, 2002 SD 111, ¶ 14, 651 NW2d 269, 273 (citations ...

In re MDD

... 23A-28 (restitution in criminal cases) or SDCL 26-8C-7(1) and 26-8B-6(4) (restitution in juvenile delinquency cases). Statutory interpretation is a question of law we review de novo. ... [¶ 4.] SDCL ch. 23A-28 authorizes an award of restitution to specified "victims" in criminal cases. ...