Prairieville Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyer, Louisiana


Benjamin Gordon Bartage Lawyer

Benjamin Gordon Bartage

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Estate, Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Motor Vehicle

Hello and thank you for visiting our website! My name is Ben Bartage---I am the founding partner of Bartage & Anderson, LLC. I founded this firm becau... (more)

David M Cohn

Commercial Real Estate, Corporate, Business Organization, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

D. Brian Cohn

Bankruptcy, Corporate, Business Organization, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Morley Chenail Diment

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years
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Matthew William Pryor

Class Action, Bad Faith Insurance, Collection, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Timothy Earle Pujol

Class Action, Collection, Products Liability, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Christopher J. Bridges

Bankruptcy, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

William E Steffes

Other, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

William Edward Steffes

Other, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Trenton A. Grand

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Prairieville Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyers and Prairieville Bankruptcy & Debt Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Bankruptcy & Debt practice areas such as Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt, Reorganization and Workout matters.

LEGAL TERMS

IRS EXPENSES

A table of national and regional expense estimates published by the IRS. Debtors whose current monthly income is more than their state's median family income mu... (more...)
A table of national and regional expense estimates published by the IRS. Debtors whose current monthly income is more than their state's median family income must use the IRS expenses to calculate their average net income in a Chapter 7 case, or their disposable income in a Chapter 13 case.

SUBROGATION

A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off i... (more...)
A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off its injured claimant takes the legal rights the claimant has against a third party that caused the injury, and sues that third party.

CREDIT FILE

See credit report.

REDEMPTION

In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor obtains legal title to collateral for a debt by paying the creditor the replacement value of the collateral in a lump s... (more...)
In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor obtains legal title to collateral for a debt by paying the creditor the replacement value of the collateral in a lump sum. For example, a debtor may redeem a car note by paying the lender the amount a retail vendor would charge for the car, considering its age and condition.

MEETING OF CREDITORS

A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a f... (more...)
A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a few questions. In a Chapter 7, the meeting of creditors lasts a few minutes and rarely do any creditors show up. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, one or two creditors may attend, especially if they disagree with some provision of your repayment plan.

ACCORD AND SATISFACTION

An agreement to settle a contract dispute by accepting less than what's due. This procedure is often used by creditors who want to cut their losses by collectin... (more...)
An agreement to settle a contract dispute by accepting less than what's due. This procedure is often used by creditors who want to cut their losses by collecting as much money as they can from debtors who cannot pay the full amount.

CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY

The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 b... (more...)
The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 bankruptcy takes from three to six months, costs about $200, and commonly requires only one trip to the courthouse.

DISCHARGE (OF DEBTS)

A bankruptcy court's erasure of the debts of a person or business that has filed for bankruptcy.

LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner ... (more...)
A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner or partners (called general partners) have unlimited personal liability. The key difference between a general and limited partner concerns management decision making--general partners run the business, and limited partners, who are usually passive investors, are not allowed to make day-to-day business decisions. If they do, they risk being treated as general partners with unlimited personal liability.