Rockingham County, NH Criminal Lawyers


Frank  Cimler Lawyer

Frank Cimler

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Accident & Injury, Business
Experience... When Experience Matters.

Attorney Frank Cimler is a Cum Laude graduate of the University of Maryland where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management and ... (more)

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800-957-8401

Carl D Olson Lawyer

Carl D Olson

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Traffic

An experienced and successful criminal defense attorney since 1990. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin Law School, Attorney Olson joine... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-773-2610

Joseph  Welsh Lawyer

Joseph Welsh

VERIFIED
Criminal, Motor Vehicle, Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Car Accident

NH Attorney Joseph Welsh is an experienced trial attorney. He began trying cases while he was still a student in law school twenty years ago and hasn'... (more)

Karyn Krause Cumberland Lawyer

Karyn Krause Cumberland

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Estate
Providing Big Firm Expertise & Results With the Intimacy & Cost Only Possible With a Smaller Firm.

Karyn Krause Cumberland is an elder law lawyer proudly serving Stratham, New Hampshire and the neighboring communities.

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Justin P. Nadeau

Animal Bite, Criminal, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

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K. Garth Corriveau

Animal Bite, Asbestos & Mesothelioma, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Richard E. Clark

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nicholas Howie

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

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Richard Samdperil

Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Accident & Injury

Richard Samdperil

Accident & Injury, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony

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LEGAL TERMS

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.

EXPUNGE

To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the crimi... (more...)
To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the criminal records of a juvenile offender to be expunged when he reaches the age of majority, to allow him to begin his adult life with a clean record. Or, a company or government agency may routinely expunge out-of-date records to save storage space.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

HUNG JURY

A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations ... (more...)
A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations with an assurance (sometimes known as a 'dynamite charge') that they will be able to reach a decision if they try harder. If a mistrial is declared, the case is tried again unless the parties settle the case (in a civil case) or the prosecution dismisses the charges or offers a plea bargain (in a criminal case).

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

AGGRAVATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, th... (more...)
Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, the crime of aggravated assault is a physical attack made worse because it is committed with a dangerous weapon, results in severe bodily injury or is made in conjunction with another serious crime. Aggravated assault is usually considered a felony, punishable by a prison sentence.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Burgess

... The State based this request upon: (1) the defendant's character; (2) prior criminal history, which included, among other convictions, three prior convictions for escape; (3) the nature and circumstances of the offenses; and (4) potential for deterrence and rehabilitation. ...

State v. Laporte

... At the close of the State's case, the defendant moved to dismiss the indictment, arguing that it failed to allege, in accordance with the criminal solicitation statute, that he acted "with a purpose that another engage in conduct constituting a crime." RSA 629:2, I (2007). ...

Hilario v. Reardon

... Id. In assessing whether Mahoney could maintain the action for malpractice against his former criminal defense attorney and her firm, we held: ... Public policy, however, dictates an augmented standard in criminal malpractice actions. ...