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Errick Alan Miles Lawyer

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Errick is an Associate Attorney with Smith Bovill, P.C., who began his employment with Smith Bovill, P.C. following his graduation from Thomas M. Cool... (more)

Randy L. Price

Other, Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Christopher A Swartz

Estate, Family Law, Criminal, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years
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Daniel Joseph Straka

Lawsuit & Dispute, Government, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Christopher S. Boyd

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Alan A. Crawford

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Alexandria Jay Brady

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

Kelly Daniel Ellsworth

Trusts, Divorce, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Matthew Lee Frey

Estate Planning, Estate, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

INFORMATION

The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or ... (more...)
The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or a misdemeanor. The information tells the defendant what crime he is charged with, against whom and when the offense allegedly occurred, but the prosecutor is not obliged to go into great detail. If the defendant wants more specifics, he must ask for it by way of a discovery request. Compare indictment.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

People v. Wilder

... And that was that. So, the People have to show that the defendant entered without permission, for the purpose of committing a misdemeanor, taking property, or committing a felony. That his body did go in, so he entered without the owner's permission. ...

People v. Sadows

... and remand for further proceedings. 96 I. In Docket No. 286689, defendant, Colleen Sadows, was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated (OWI), MCL 257.625(1), a misdemeanor. Because Sadows was previously ...

People v. Reid

... SAWYER, J. This case presents the question whether the circuit court possesses the jurisdiction 160 to try a defendant on a misdemeanor charge when the accompanying felony charge was dismissed before the beginning of trial. ... Thus, only the misdemeanor charge remained. ...