Santa Fe Real Estate Lawyer, New Mexico


Gregory W. MacKenzie Lawyer

Gregory W. MacKenzie

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Estate, Wills, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning

Greg has been a partner at Hurley Toevs Styles Hamblin & Panter PA since 2008. He was formerly a partner of the trust and estate litigation firm of Po... (more)

Sean  Ramirez Lawyer

Sean Ramirez

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Estate

Sean S. Ramirez joined Frazier Law Office in 2016 and in 2018 he took over the day-to-day operations of Frazier & Ramirez Law. Sean’s legal focus is... (more)

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800-644-3570

Karen Aubrey

Estate, Real Estate, Oil & Gas
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gary Douglas Elion

Family Law, Banking & Finance, International, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Jeannette Whittaker

Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Dennis M Feld

Bankruptcy & Debt, Tax, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sylvain Segal

Real Estate, Corporate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brett Steinbook

Corporate, Real Estate, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bret A. Blanchard

Corporate, Gaming & Alcohol, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jay Goodman

Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Criminal, Business, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

QUASI-COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A form of property owned by a married couple. If a couple moves to a community property state from a non-community property state, property they acquired togeth... (more...)
A form of property owned by a married couple. If a couple moves to a community property state from a non-community property state, property they acquired together in the non-community property state may be considered quasi-community property. Quasi-community property is treated just like community property when one spouse dies or if the couple divorces.

FORFEITURE

The loss of property or a privilege due to breaking a law. For example, a landlord may forfeit his or her property to the federal or state government if the lan... (more...)
The loss of property or a privilege due to breaking a law. For example, a landlord may forfeit his or her property to the federal or state government if the landlord knows it is a drug-dealing site but fails to stop the illegal activity. Or, you may have to forfeit your driver's license if you commit too many moving violations or are convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

WORDS OF PROCREATION

Language used to leave property to a person and his or her descendants, which typically take the form 'to A, and the heirs of his body,' where A is the person r... (more...)
Language used to leave property to a person and his or her descendants, which typically take the form 'to A, and the heirs of his body,' where A is the person receiving the property.

EVIDENCE

The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony... (more...)
The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony of witnesses, documents, photographs, items of damaged property, government records, videos and laboratory reports. Rules that are as strict as they are quirky and technical govern what types of evidence can be properly admitted as part of a trial. For example, the hearsay rule purports to prevent secondhand testimony of the 'he said, she said' variety, but the existence of dozens of exceptions often means that hairsplitting lawyers can find a way to introduce such testimony into evidence. See also admissible evidence, inadmissible evidence.

ADVERSE POSSESSION

A means by which one can legally take another's property without paying for it. The requirements for adversely possessing property vary between states, but usua... (more...)
A means by which one can legally take another's property without paying for it. The requirements for adversely possessing property vary between states, but usually include continuous and open use for a period of five or more years and paying taxes on the property in question.

LIFE TENANT

One who has a life estate in real property.

DONATION

A gift of property. The IRS allows you to take an income tax deduction for the value of donations made to charitable organizations who are recognized as such by... (more...)
A gift of property. The IRS allows you to take an income tax deduction for the value of donations made to charitable organizations who are recognized as such by the IRS.

HEIR

One who receives property from someone who has died. While the traditional meaning includes only those who had a legal right to the deceased person's property, ... (more...)
One who receives property from someone who has died. While the traditional meaning includes only those who had a legal right to the deceased person's property, modern usage includes anyone who receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

NULLA BONA

Latin for 'no goods.' This is what the sheriff writes when she can find no property to seize in order to pay off a court judgment.