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Scotland County, NC Estate Lawyers


Daniel B. Dean

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nickolas J. Sojka

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew G. Williamson

Personal Injury, Commercial Real Estate, Social Security, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nickolas J. Sojka

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

William R. Purcell

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Lisa Snyder Freedman

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Jonathan L. Mcinnis

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Leslie L. Mills Bruner

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Leslie M. Bruner

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Lisa S. Freedman

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find North Carolina Estate Lawyers and North Carolina Estate Law Firms. Find Estate attorneys by major city or select a city from the list of all North Carolina cities. Alternatively you can search for Estate attorneys for all North Carolina cities or search by county. You may also also find it useful to refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

PREDECEASED SPOUSE

In the law of wills, a spouse who dies before the will maker while still married to him or her.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

TESTAMENTARY TRUST

A trust created by a will, effective only upon the death of the willmaker.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.