Sisseton Bankruptcy Lawyer, South Dakota


Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Brenda J. Bellonger

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Brenda J. Bellonger

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Erin C. Cameron

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas S. Mortland

Insurance, Commercial Bankruptcy, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Gregory James Garvey

General Practice
Status:  Suspended           Licensed:  21 Years

Daniel Leslie Jongeling

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  37 Years

Kerry M. Cameron

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shannon M. George-Larson

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kay F. Nikolas

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gordon P. Nielsen

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Native People
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

LIEN

The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortg... (more...)
The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortgages, home equity loans, car loans and personal loans for which you pledge property to guarantee repayment. Liens created without your consent are called nonconsensual liens, and include judgment liens (liens filed by a creditor who has sued you and obtained a judgment), tax liens and mechanics liens (liens filed by a contractor who worked on your house but wasn't paid).

DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN

A type of pension plan that does not guarantee any particular pension amount upon retirement. Instead, the employer pays into the pension fund a certain amount ... (more...)
A type of pension plan that does not guarantee any particular pension amount upon retirement. Instead, the employer pays into the pension fund a certain amount every month, or every year, for each employee. The employer usually pays a fixed percentage of an employee's wages or salary, although sometimes the amount is a fraction of the company's profits, with the size of each employee's pension share depending on the amount of wage or salary. Upon retirement, each employee's pension is determined by how much was contributed to the fund on behalf of that employee over the years, plus whatever earnings that money has accumulated as part of the investments of the entire pension fund.

DEBIT CARD

A card issued by a bank that combines the functions of an ATM card and checks. A debit card can be used to withdraw cash at a bank like an ATM card, and it can ... (more...)
A card issued by a bank that combines the functions of an ATM card and checks. A debit card can be used to withdraw cash at a bank like an ATM card, and it can also be used at stores to pay for goods and services in place of a check. Unlike a credit card, a debit card automatically withdraws money from your checking account at the time of the transaction. Debit cards are regulated by the Electronic Funds Transfer Act.

MEETING OF CREDITORS

A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a f... (more...)
A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a few questions. In a Chapter 7, the meeting of creditors lasts a few minutes and rarely do any creditors show up. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, one or two creditors may attend, especially if they disagree with some provision of your repayment plan.

DISCHARGEABLE DEBTS

Debts that can be erased by going through bankruptcy. Most debts incurred prior to declaring bankruptcy are dischargeable, including back rent, credit card bill... (more...)
Debts that can be erased by going through bankruptcy. Most debts incurred prior to declaring bankruptcy are dischargeable, including back rent, credit card bills and medical bills. Compare nondischargeable debts.

TRADE NAME

The official name of a business, the one it uses on its letterhead and bank account when not dealing with consumers.

CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY

The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 b... (more...)
The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 bankruptcy takes from three to six months, costs about $200, and commonly requires only one trip to the courthouse.

CREDIT BUREAU

A private, profit-making company that collects and sells information about a person's credit history. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders and credit... (more...)
A private, profit-making company that collects and sells information about a person's credit history. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders and credit card companies that use the information to screen applicants for loans and credit cards. There are three major credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian and Trans Union, and they are regulated by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

REPOSSESSION

A creditor's taking property that has been pledged as collateral for a loan. Lenders will most often repossess cars when the owner has missed loan payments and ... (more...)
A creditor's taking property that has been pledged as collateral for a loan. Lenders will most often repossess cars when the owner has missed loan payments and has not attempted to work with the lender to resolve the problem. A repossessor can't use force to get at your car, but he can legally hot-wire it and even drive it out of your unlocked garage.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

United Bldg. Centers v. Ochs

... Ochs denied the complaint and claimed the restitution order entered as part of his state criminal conviction was discharged in his Chapter 7 federal bankruptcy proceedings. ... Criminal restitution orders survive bankruptcy proceedings. ...

Spencer v. Estate of Spencer

... In 1984, Spencers filed for bankruptcy. Spencers' bankruptcy schedules claimed a one-half interest in the thirty-two acres. ... Dale told Spencers he did not have to explain, and Dale refused to talk with Joseph's bankruptcy lawyer. ...

Kramer v. WILLIAM F. MURPHY SELF-DECLARATION OF TRUST

... However, the Disbursement Agreement did not contain a forum-selection clause. [¶7.] Tri-State Ethanol was unable to meet its financial obligations and eventually filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. ... The bankruptcy court approved the settlement agreement. ...