Snyder Wills & Probate Lawyer, Nebraska


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

Mary E. Vandenack

Estate Administration, Pension & Benefits, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Stephen P. Schmidt

Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Patricia M. Samuels

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Kirk E. Goettsch

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Kermit A. Brashear

Commercial Real Estate, Litigation, Wills, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kyle Alan Barlow

Estate Administration, Business Organization, Contract, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Lisa M. Line

Litigation, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nora J. Keenan

DUI-DWI, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

INCOMPETENCE

The inability, as determined by a court, to handle one's own personal or financial affairs. A court may declare that a person is incompetent after a hearing at ... (more...)
The inability, as determined by a court, to handle one's own personal or financial affairs. A court may declare that a person is incompetent after a hearing at which the person is present and/or represented by an attorney. A finding of incompetence may lead to the appointment of a conservator to manage the person's affairs. Also known as 'incompetency.'

FINAL BENEFICIARY

The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jan... (more...)
The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jane receives income for the duration of her life. Their daughter, the final beneficiary, receives the trust principal after Jane's death.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Chrisp

... In February 2005, Gail filed a petition for formal probate in a supervised administration. In March 2005, the county court admitted Chrisp's will to probate, and Gail accepted appointment as the estate's personal representative. ... (b) "Estate" in § 30-2314 Means "Probate Estate". ...

In re Estate of Cooper

... ANALYSIS. The Filing of a Statement of Claim in a Probate Proceeding Does Not Constitute the Practice of Law. ... The Filing of a Demand for Notice in a Probate Proceeding by an Attorney Not Licensed to Practice Law in This State Is Not the Unauthorized Practice of Law. ...

Clark v. Clark

... transfer. Article 27 of the Nebraska Probate Code governs nonprobate transfers. [2] Section 30-2715 provides: ... [6] Therefore, we do not address this assignment of error. FILING OF CLAIM IN PROBATE OF LIBBIE'S ESTATE. Finally ...