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Spencerville Trusts Lawyer, Maryland

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Patricia Anne Ricci

Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Anthony William Morris

Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shaida Shirmohammadi Farid

Corporate, Mediation, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Lynn Loughlin Skerpon

Trusts
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Gail Roberta Kahan

Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard G Kozlowski

Elder Law, Environmental Law Other, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Edward W. Nylen

Trusts, Title Insurance, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Trevor Courteney Correia

Trusts, Employee Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Kelcie Lee Longaker

Corporate, Land Use & Zoning, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Nadia Allison Richards

Elder Law, Family Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

PREDECEASED SPOUSE

In the law of wills, a spouse who dies before the will maker while still married to him or her.

CHARITABLE TRUST

Any trust designed to make a substantial gift to a charity and also achieve income and estate tax savings for the person who creates the trust (the grantor).

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Johnson v. Johnson

... George T. Bogert, The Law of Trusts and Trustees § 181 at 244-46 (Rev.2d ed.1979) (internal footnotes omitted). ... Once the shares were distributed into Trusts A and B, the Trust set forth how the Trustee was to hold, manage, and distribute the Trust. ...

Elder v. Smith

... Vol.), § 8-104 of the Estates and Trusts Article ("ET"). ... Again, the Estates and Trusts Article governs such claims, and there is nothing in that Article permitting a creditor with a pre-death claim to enhance the priority of its claim post-death. ...

Spry v. Gooner

... appellants lacked standing. The basis of the order was that appellants were not "interested persons" within the meaning of Maryland Code (2001 Repl.Vol., 2008 Supp.), § 1-101(i) of the Estates & Trusts Article ("ET"). Ralph Gooner ...