Tuscola County, MI Divorce Lawyers

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Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Pamela E. Stefan

Contract, Collection, Elder Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Tara J. Hofmeister

Family Law, Estate Planning, Other, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Phoebe Jacob Moore

Family Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Melissa L. Malloy

Divorce, Juvenile Law, Children's Rights, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years
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Duane E. Burgess

Family Law, Children's Rights, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Denis J Mccarthy

Personal Injury, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kerry A. Rastigue

Medicare & Medicaid, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Gary J. Crews

Elder Law, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

Amanda L. Roggenbuck

Contract, Divorce, Trusts, Agriculture
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Berger v. Berger

... Defendant appeals by right a judgment of divorce entered after a six-day trial. ... We do not agree with defendant's argument that MCL 552.9(1) requires plaintiff's continuing physical presence in Jackson County for the 10 days immediately preceding filing for divorce. ...

Estes v. Titus

... [9]. III. THE UFTA'S APPLICATION TO PROPERTY SETTLEMENTS IN DIVORCE CASES. In her appeal, Swabash argues ... a transfer. IV. UFTA RELIEF AND COLLATERAL ATTACKS ON DIVORCE JUDGMENTS. The dissenting judge ...

Thornton v. Thornton

... On September 14, 1993, the trial court entered the parties' consent judgment of divorce. The judgment of divorce provided that defendant must pay permanent alimony of $125 a week to plaintiff until further order of the court. In addition, the judgment of divorce provided: Plaintiff . ...