Warwick Trusts Lawyer, Rhode Island

Sponsored Law Firm


James S. Lawrence Lawyer

James S. Lawrence

VERIFIED
Lawsuit & Dispute, Trusts, Criminal, Corporate, Estate

Jim Lawrence is the President of LAWRENCE & ASSOCIATES, INC. He has spent over thirty years as a practicing attorney, specializing in Estate Planning... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-701-4870

J. Katherine Scott

Estate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Richard H. Gregory

Estate, Trusts, Tax, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Rebecca N. Warr

Other, Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Jill E. Sugarman

Power of Attorney, Elder Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jonathan L. Stanzler

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Evelyn Weiss Zawatsky

Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carol E. Najarian

Real Estate, Family Law, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Vernon L. Gorton

Real Estate, Elder Law, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Warwick Trusts Lawyers and Warwick Trusts Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Estate Planning, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR

Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to t... (more...)
Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to the state. Some states have public administrators who are responsible for temporarily preserving the assets of an estate if there are disputes about specific provisions in the will or about who will be appointed the regular administrator.

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Carrozza v. Voccola

... A. resulting Trusts, the 2002 Case. 1. ... 2. Resulting Trusts. The type of resulting trust in which plaintiffs allege the four disputed properties are held is known more specifically as a "purchase money resulting trust." George T. Bogert, Trusts § 74 at 266 (6th ed. 1987). ...

FLEET NAT. BANK v. Hunt

... Present: WILLIAMS, CJ, GOLDBERG, FLAHERTY, and SUTTELL, JJ. OPINION. Chief Justice WILLIAMS, for the Court. The appellants, Ronald Gay and Wylma Cooley (appellants), appeal from a Superior Court order directing the distribution of assets under two trusts. ...

Goddard v. Bank of America

... The Petitioners list themselves as "all known or unascertained beneficiaries of [the] Trusts." (Petitioner's Mem. ... (Exhibit I, tab A5, p.30; tab C2, p. 14.). • allow the committee to change the jurisdiction of the trusts. (Exhibit I, tab A5, p. 30; tab C2, p. 14). ...

Now Chatting...