West Orange Child Support Lawyer, New Jersey

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Allison C. Williams

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Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody
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Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy as a Family Law Trial Attorney, and Certified... (more)

Richard L. Slavitt

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lynne Strober

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Janice Newman Teetsell

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Cathleen G. Mcdonough

Family Law, Child Support, Custody & Visitation, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anthony N Picillo

Child Support, Divorce, Farms, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

CASE

A term that most often refers to a lawsuit -- for example, 'I filed my small claims case.' 'Case' also refers to a written decision by a judge -- or for an appe... (more...)
A term that most often refers to a lawsuit -- for example, 'I filed my small claims case.' 'Case' also refers to a written decision by a judge -- or for an appellate case, a panel of judges. For example, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision legalizing abortion is commonly referred to as the Roe v. Wade case. Finally, the term also describes the evidence a party submits in support of her position -- for example, 'I have made my case' or ''My case-in-chief' has been completed.'

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

ADULTERY

Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are ra... (more...)
Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are rarely prosecuted for it. In states that have retained fault grounds for divorce, adultery is always sufficient grounds for a divorce. In addition, some states alter the distribution of property between divorcing spouses in cases of adultery, giving less to the 'cheating' spouse.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Strahan v. Strahan

... marriage. An amended judgment was entered on January 12, 2007 addressing the validity of the agreement, equitable distribution, child support, disability insurance for plaintiff and counsel fees. In ... fees. A. Child Support. Plaintiff ...

Gotlib v. Gotlib

... Based on this imputed income, defendant was required to pay $352 per week in child support. ... Additionally, defendant claims he is entitled to a credit for the child support he paid plaintiff during the twenty-month period of time Aaron lived with him during 2001 and 2002. ...

Donnelly v. Donnelly

... FISHER, JAD. In this appeal, we review the denial of defendant's motion for a downward modification of his alimony and child support obligations. ... Gregory used those funds to pay down certain debts and eliminate the existing alimony and child support arrearages. ...