Whately Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Massachusetts


Leslie McLellan Brown Lawyer

Leslie McLellan Brown

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Prenuptial Agreements, Divorce, Family Law, Child Support

For more than 32 years, Attorney Leslie McLellan Brown has been dedicated to obtaining the fairest result possible. Providing in-depth knowledge and h... (more)

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800-953-0690

Thomas P. Vincent

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Devlin Terrance Farmer

Family Law, Mediation, Collaborative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Julia Yael Rueschemeyer

Lawsuit & Dispute, Immigration, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years
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Scott D Kuhn

Divorce, Business, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

UNCONTESTED DIVORCE

A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court... (more...)
A divorce automatically granted by a court when the spouse who is served with a summons and complaint for divorce fails to file a formal response with the court. Many divorces proceed this way when the spouses have worked everything out and there's no reason for both to go to court -- and pay the court costs.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.