Ask A Lawyer

Tell Us Your Case Information for Fastest Lawyer Match!

Please include all relevant details from your case including where, when, and who it involoves.
Case details that can effectively describe the legal situation while also staying concise generally receive the best responses from lawyers.


By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

York County, SC Divorce Lawyers

Sponsored Law Firm


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

David James McWilliam Lawyer

David James McWilliam

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Mediation

David McWilliam is an attorney practicing in Fort Mill, South Carolina. His legal practice includes divorce law and family law. David is also a CERTI... (more)

Bradford A. Rawlinson

Family Law, Wrongful Death, Traffic, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

David Bryan Sample

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Divorce, Accident & Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Joshua Brian Mitchell

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Custody & Visitation, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Easily find South Carolina Divorce Lawyers and South Carolina Divorce Law Firms for your location. Narrow your Divorce attorney search for South Carolina by major city or a specific South Carolina city using the city list. Or search for South Carolina Divorce attorneys by county. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Simpson v. Simpson

... (Father). In December 2004, Judge R. Wright Turbeville granted Mother and Father a divorce. As a shareholder/member of WR Simpson Farms, LLC, Husband was named a party to Mother and Father's divorce action. Husband ...

Eason v. Eason

... Justice WALLER. This is a cross-appeal from the family court's order which granted appellant/respondent Charlean L. Eason ("Wife") and respondent/appellant Fredrick W. Eason ("Husband") a divorce based on one year's continuous separation. ...

Marquez v. Caudill

... They had a rocky relationship and separated three times. Amy filed for divorce shortly after Katie's birth. ... They reconciled and then separated again in 2003. Stepfather left on Amy's request and filed for divorce and custody of the children. ...