Allison Park DUI-DWI Lawyer, Pennsylvania


Michael Angelo Maccagnan Lawyer

Michael Angelo Maccagnan

VERIFIED
Real Estate, DUI-DWI, Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney, Land Use & Zoning
Providing legal services with professionalism, integrity and respect.

Attorney Michael Angelo Maccagnan earned his Juris Doctorate degree from Duquesne University School of Law. He also earned a Bachelor of Science degr... (more)

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800-598-8590

Michael  Worgul Lawyer

Michael Worgul

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Traffic

My name is Michael Worgul. I was born and raised right here in Pittsburgh, and it’s probably no surprise that I’ve settled down here too. I went t... (more)

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800-514-7620

Joseph Alexander Paletta Lawyer

Joseph Alexander Paletta

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Criminal, Traffic, Medical Malpractice

I am Joseph Paletta, a veteran attorney having represented more than 10,000 clients in over 25 years of experience as a trial lawyer. Whether your iss... (more)

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412-391-7999

Douglas Sughrue

Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Sandra S. Neuman

DUI-DWI, Litigation, Medical Malpractice, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lisa M. Petruzzi

Adoption, Child Support, Farms, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ronald W. Hayward

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Adoption, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Ralph D. Karsh

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           

L. Ian O'Brien

DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Justin John-Earl Ketchel

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

PROBABLE CAUSE

The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a searc... (more...)
The amount and quality of information police must have before they can arrest or search without a warrant or that a judge must have before she will sign a search warrant allowing the police to conduct a search or arrest a suspect. Reliable information must show that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and the suspect is involved.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

ACCESSORY

Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An acces... (more...)
Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An accessory is usually not physically present during the crime. For example, hiding a robber who is being sought by the police might make you an 'accessory after the fact' to a robbery. Compare accomplice.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Com. v. Haag

... In this appeal, we are asked to determine whether two offenses of Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol ("DUI") occurring within one and one-half hours of each other should be considered first and second offenses for purposes of sentencing under the recidivist provisions of ...

Glidden v. COM., DEPT. OF TRANSP.

... County (trial court) that denied his statutory appeal from a one-year suspension of his operating privileges for a violation of Section 3802(a)(1) of the Vehicle Code, 75 Pa.CS § 3802(a)(1) (driving under the influence of alcohol or controlled substance (DUI), general impairment). ...

Reinhart v. COM., DEPT. OF TRANSP.

... suspended Licensee's operating privileges because of three criminal convictions arising from a single accident: reckless driving; failing to stop his vehicle at an accident scene where 168 death or personal injury was involved; and driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI). ...