Altoona Estate Lawyer, Iowa


Marlon D. Mormann Lawyer

Marlon D. Mormann

VERIFIED
Employment, Discrimination, Estate, Car Accident, Criminal
Employment lawyer accepting new workers' compensation and personal injury cases.

Marlon is a former Iowa Unemployment Administrative Law Judge and Deputy Workers' Compensation Commissioner now in private practice with 32 years lega... (more)

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515-710-0902

Benjamin D. Bruner

Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Real Estate, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Arthur C Hedberg

Social Security -- Disability, Government Agencies, Wills & Probate, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Max Burkey

Animal Bite, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Estate Administration
Status:  In Good Standing           
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David L. Brown

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Michael Kenny Thibodeau

Social Security, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Corporate, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Tod J. Beavers

Wills & Probate, Family Law, Securities, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Todd Anthony Elverson

Business, Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Power of Attorney
Status:  In Good Standing           

Scott A. Hall

Corporate, Collection, Family Law, Estate Planning, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

Lyle L. Simpson

Agriculture, Trusts, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  57 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Altoona Estate Lawyers and Altoona Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

INVESTOR

A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes invest... (more...)
A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes investments for others who have entrusted her with their money.

TESTAMENTARY TRUST

A trust created by a will, effective only upon the death of the willmaker.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

ABSTRACT OF TRUST

A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract... (more...)
A condensed version of a living trust document, which leaves out details of what is in the trust and the identity of the beneficiaries. You can show an abstract of trust to a financial organization or other institution to prove that you have established a valid living trust, without revealing specifics that you want to keep private. In some states, this document is called a 'certification of trust.'

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.