Athens White Collar Crime Lawyer, Georgia

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Robert Douglas Lenhardt Lawyer

Robert Douglas Lenhardt

VERIFIED
Criminal, Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury, Business & Trade

Doug Lenhardt concentrates his practice in the areas of Criminal Defense, Bankruptcy, and Personal Injury. Since 2002, Doug has served the Athens com... (more)

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800-981-1450

David Roberts Whitmire Lawyer

David Roberts Whitmire

VERIFIED
Divorce, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

Dr. Whitmire has both a law degree (J.D.) and Chemical Engineering degrees (B.S., M.S. Ph.D.). Does this matter? Sometimes it can make all the differe... (more)

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800-836-3220

Kim T. Stephens Lawyer

Kim T. Stephens

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, US Courts, Education
A Boutique Athens Law Firm, Providing Professional Advice and a Powerful Defense.

Kim T. Stephens ranks as one of the most accomplished trial lawyers and attorneys in the state of Georgia. With more than twenty-two years of experien... (more)

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800-805-0450

Elizabeth M. Grant

Traffic, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Adam M. Cain

Collection, Complex Litigation, DUI-DWI, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Howard T. Scott

Criminal, Personal Injury, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Nancee Tomlinson

Juvenile Law, Wills & Probate, Criminal, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Markus Boenig

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, Felony
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jeffery Alan Rothman

Traffic, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

John W. Timmons

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  49 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

ARRAIGNMENT

A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters... (more...)
A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters often handled at the arraignment are arranging for the appointment of a lawyer to represent the defendant and the setting of bail.

HUNG JURY

A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations ... (more...)
A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations with an assurance (sometimes known as a 'dynamite charge') that they will be able to reach a decision if they try harder. If a mistrial is declared, the case is tried again unless the parties settle the case (in a civil case) or the prosecution dismisses the charges or offers a plea bargain (in a criminal case).

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.