Billings Criminal Lawyer, Montana


Penelope  Strong Lawyer

Penelope Strong

VERIFIED
Criminal, Constitutional Law, Professional Responsibility

Penelope Strong is a practicing lawyer in the state of Montana. Attorney Strong received her J.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1979.

James David Sweet Lawyer

James David Sweet

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Estate, Native People

James Sweet proudly serves Billings, MT and the neighboring communities in the areas of Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Plan... (more)

Mark David Parker

Bad Faith, Criminal, Personal Injury, Legal Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Emily Jones

Criminal, Toxic Mold & Tort, Federal Appellate Practice, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years
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Gregory Murphy

Criminal, Native People, Insurance, Health Care Other
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  42 Years

Paula Saye Dooper

Corporate, Criminal, Real Estate, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Cammi Woodward

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury

Gregory Paul Johnson

Art, Adoption, Criminal, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Cory Thomas Harman

Credit & Debt, Traffic, Federal, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Molly Rose Buckley Fehringer

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

PUBLIC DEFENDER

A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and ar... (more...)
A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and are unable to pay for their own defense.

EXPUNGE

To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the crimi... (more...)
To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the criminal records of a juvenile offender to be expunged when he reaches the age of majority, to allow him to begin his adult life with a clean record. Or, a company or government agency may routinely expunge out-of-date records to save storage space.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

BAIL BOND

The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear... (more...)
The money posted by a 'bondsman' for a defendant who cannot afford his bail. The defendant pays a certain portion, usually 10%. If the defendant fails to appear for a court hearing, the judge can issue a warrant for his arrest and threaten to 'forfeit,' or keep, the money if the defendant doesn't appear soon. Usually, the bondsman will look for the defendant and bring him back, forcefully if necessary, in order to avoid losing the bail money.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. McWilliams

... At about the same time, Johns and Curry each brought complaints against McWilliams in relation to the check transactions described above. ¶14 In February 2002, the State brought criminal charges against McWilliams for theft and issuing bad checks. ...

Whitlow v. State

... 05-128. Supreme Court of Montana. Submitted on Briefs February 23, 2006. Decided April 22, 2008. 862 For Appellant: Jeffrey T. Renz, Attorney at Law, Jason Lazark, Intern, Criminal Defense Clinic, University of Montana School of Law, Missoula, Montana. For Appellee: Hon. ...

State v. Rosling

... appeals from his conviction and sentence in the District Court for the First Judicial District, Lewis and Clark County, on charges of deliberate homicide, aggravated kidnapping, aggravated burglary, tampering with or fabricating physical evidence, and criminal possession of ...