Calgary Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Alberta

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Mathew  Wirove Lawyer

Mathew Wirove

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law
Family Lawyer with Crossroads Law

Mathew Wirove practices exclusively in family law but worked previously as a civil litigator for a top litigation firm in Calgary. This has given him ... (more)

Amanda  Marsden Lawyer

Amanda Marsden

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law
Family Lawyer Who Understand Choose The Right Path

Prior to working in the area of family law, Amanda gained experience at a large national law firm where she learned to appreciate and understand the c... (more)

Sadaf  Raja Lawyer

Sadaf Raja

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Juvenile Law, Motor Vehicle, Accident & Injury

We are a law firm specializing in family law and divorce. We can offer clients seeking to settle their family law matters efficiently. We are committe... (more)

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403-262-7722

Paul  Gracia Lawyer

Paul Gracia

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Felony, Misdemeanor

Facing criminal charges can be very stressful – especially for those who have never had any experience with the criminal justice system before. The ... (more)

Donna  Gee Lawyer

Donna Gee

VERIFIED
Estate

Donna Gee was born in Calgary and grew up on a farm outside Banff. She is one of the few registered nurse-lawyers in Canada. Donna received her Bachel... (more)

Brent  Mainwood Lawyer

Brent Mainwood

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Residential Real Estate

After 19 years of practicing law at a downtown Calgary firm, Brent ventured into his own sole practitioner venture, Mainwood Legal, in 2000. Since the... (more)

Lorli J. S. Dukart Lawyer

Lorli J. S. Dukart

VERIFIED
Estate, Power of Attorney, Elder Law, Real Estate, Business

Why Choose Us Honest, Expert Lawyers Dukart Law Firm has years of experience that give our clients peace of mind. Modern Legal Care Lorli J.S.... (more)

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403-216-6837

Jeffrey  Kahane Lawyer

Jeffrey Kahane

VERIFIED
Wills & Probate, Real Estate Other, Corporate, Divorce, Wrongful Termination
Award Winning Law Firm With Flat Rates

A different approach to law: Kahane Law Office looks to provide exceptional service at reasonable rate. We have enough legal experience that we can of... (more)

Robert  Anderson Lawyer

Robert Anderson

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Estate, Business

Robert Anderson is a practicing lawyer in Alberta, CA.

Rachel West

Employment, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

STEPCHILD

A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological ... (more...)
A child born to your spouse before your marriage whom you have not legally adopted. If you adopt the child, he or she is legally treated just like a biological offspring. Under the Uniform Probate Code, followed in some states, a stepchild belongs in the same class as a biological child and will inherit property left 'to my children.' In other states, a stepchild is not treated like a biological child unless he or she can prove that the parental relationship was established when he or she was a minor and that adoption would have occurred but for some legal obstacle.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE

A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states ... (more...)
A document that provides proof of a marriage, typically issued to the newlyweds a few weeks after they file for the certificate in a county office. Most states require both spouses, the person who officiated the marriage and one or two witnesses to sign the marriage certificate; often this is done just after the ceremony.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.