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Cary Criminal Lawyer, North Carolina


Wiley  Nickel Lawyer

Wiley Nickel

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Criminal, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Family Law, Divorce
Call 800-985-2120 For A Free Consultation Today!

Wiley lives and works in Cary, North Carolina. In 1998, he graduated from Tulane University with a major in Political Science and a minor in History.... (more)

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Marty E. Miller Lawyer

Marty E. Miller

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General Practice
SERVING THE TRIANGLE FOR OVER FIFTEEN YEARS.

Marty Miller is a practicing attorney in the state of North Carolina. He graduated from Regent University with his J.D. in 1995. He currently works fo... (more)

Karl E Knudsen Lawyer

Karl E Knudsen

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Workers' Compensation, Criminal, Accident & Injury

I have been a trial lawyer for over thirty years in both the public and private sector. I am dedicated to providing the highest quality and most carin... (more)

Robert  Lewis Jr. Lawyer

Robert Lewis Jr.

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Bankruptcy & Debt, Personal Injury, Criminal, Employment Discrimination, Reorganization

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Katie Kelsch Dowell Lawyer

Katie Kelsch Dowell

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Estate, Real Estate, Criminal, Accident & Injury

Katie Kelsch Dowell is an attorney and founding partner of Capital City Law, licensed to practice in North Carolina. A life-long resident of Raleigh,... (more)

Kyle Abraham Smalling Lawyer

Kyle Abraham Smalling

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Business, Intellectual Property, White Collar Crime, Estate, Real Estate

Kyle Smalling is an attorney and co-owner of Capital City Law. A native of Boone, North Carolina, Kyle spent his early years in the High Country befor... (more)

Matthew Charles Faucette Lawyer

Matthew Charles Faucette

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Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Faucette Law Firm attorneys have represented individuals charged with murder, death by motor vehicle, armed robbery, burglary, kidnapping, extortion, ... (more)

Jonathan W. Stillo Lawyer

Jonathan W. Stillo

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Traffic, Immigration, Criminal, Misdemeanor, Deportation

Jonathan Stillo is a practicing lawyer in the state of North Carolina. He graduated from North Carolina Central School of Law with his J.D. in 2016. H... (more)

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Nicholas J. Dombalis

Collaborative Law, Criminal, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Family Law, Mediation
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Kimberly R. Wilson

DUI-DWI, Litigation, Medical Malpractice, Pharmaceutical Product, Premises Liability
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LEGAL TERMS

INFORMATION

The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or ... (more...)
The name of the document, sometimes called a criminal complaint or petition in which a prosecutor charges a criminal defendant with a crime, either a felony or a misdemeanor. The information tells the defendant what crime he is charged with, against whom and when the offense allegedly occurred, but the prosecutor is not obliged to go into great detail. If the defendant wants more specifics, he must ask for it by way of a discovery request. Compare indictment.

LINEUP

A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the c... (more...)
A procedure in which the police place a suspect in a line with a group of other people and ask an eyewitness to the crime to identify the person he saw at the crime scene. The police are supposed to choose similar-looking people to appear with the suspect. If the suspect alone matches the physical description of the perpetrator, evidence of the identification can be attacked at trial. For example, if the robber is described as a Latino male, and the suspect, a Latino male, is placed in a lineup with ten white males, a witness' identification of him as the robber will be challenged by the defense attorney.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Bare

... 1st. Every law that makes an action done before the passing of the law; and which was innocent when done, criminal; and punishes such action. 2d. ... A. Legislative Intent. Whether a statutory scheme is civil or criminal is first of all a question of statutory construction. ...

Dogwood Dev. & Mgmt. v. White Oak Transport

... For instance, plain error review is available in criminal appeals, Odom, 307 NC at 660, 300 SE2d at 378, for challenges to jury instructions and evidentiary issues, State v. Cummings, 352 NC 600, 613, 536 SE2d 36, 47 (2000), cert. denied, 532 US 997, 121 S.Ct. ...

State v. Styles

... Under Terry and subsequent cases, a traffic stop is permitted if the officer has a "reasonable, articulable suspicion that criminal activity is afoot." Illinois v. Wardlow, 528 US 119, 123, 120 S.Ct. 673, 675, 145 L.Ed.2d 570, 576 (2000). ...