Cary Criminal Lawyer, North Carolina

Sponsored Law Firm


Wiley  Nickel Lawyer

Wiley Nickel

VERIFIED
Criminal, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Family Law, Divorce
Call 800-985-2120 For A Free Consultation Today!

Wiley lives and works in Cary, North Carolina. In 1998, he graduated from Tulane University with a major in Political Science and a minor in History.... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-985-2120

Karl E Knudsen Lawyer

Karl E Knudsen

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Workers' Compensation, Criminal, Accident & Injury

I have been a trial lawyer for over thirty years in both the public and private sector. I am dedicated to providing the highest quality and most carin... (more)

Matthew Charles Faucette Lawyer

Matthew Charles Faucette

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Faucette Law Firm attorneys have represented individuals charged with murder, death by motor vehicle, armed robbery, burglary, kidnapping, extortion, ... (more)

Robert  Lewis Jr. Lawyer

Robert Lewis Jr.

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Personal Injury, Criminal, Employment Discrimination, Reorganization

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. I recently filed a Chapter 11... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-871-7210

Speak with Lawyer.com
James Ashley Pearce Lawyer

James Ashley Pearce

VERIFIED
DUI-DWI, Traffic, Misdemeanor, Motor Vehicle, Felony

James Pearce is a practicing lawyer in the state of North Carolina.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-977-8321

Robert E. Whitley Lawyer

Robert E. Whitley

Car Accident, Criminal, Medical Products & Devices, Elder Law, Products Liability

Robert Whitley is a lawyer in Raleigh who focuses on Car Accident cases. He has tried cases involving dangerous drugs, defective medical devices, mot... (more)

Jonathan W. Stillo Lawyer

Jonathan W. Stillo

VERIFIED
Immigration, Visa, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic

Jonathan Stillo is a practicing lawyer in the state of North Carolina. He graduated from North Carolina Central School of Law with his J.D. in 2016. H... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-970-9551

Kimberly R. Wilson

DUI-DWI, Litigation, Medical Malpractice, Pharmaceutical Product
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Brad Sahl

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Michael J. Denning

Contract, Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Cary Criminal Lawyers and Cary Criminal Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Criminal practice areas such as DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, RICO Act, White Collar Crime and Traffic matters.

LEGAL TERMS

BATTERY

A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how... (more...)
A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Bare

... 1st. Every law that makes an action done before the passing of the law; and which was innocent when done, criminal; and punishes such action. 2d. ... A. Legislative Intent. Whether a statutory scheme is civil or criminal is first of all a question of statutory construction. ...

Dogwood Dev. & Mgmt. v. White Oak Transport

... For instance, plain error review is available in criminal appeals, Odom, 307 NC at 660, 300 SE2d at 378, for challenges to jury instructions and evidentiary issues, State v. Cummings, 352 NC 600, 613, 536 SE2d 36, 47 (2000), cert. denied, 532 US 997, 121 S.Ct. ...

State v. Styles

... Under Terry and subsequent cases, a traffic stop is permitted if the officer has a "reasonable, articulable suspicion that criminal activity is afoot." Illinois v. Wardlow, 528 US 119, 123, 120 S.Ct. 673, 675, 145 L.Ed.2d 570, 576 (2000). ...