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Chicago Estate Planning Lawyer, Illinois
Includes: Gift Taxation


Sidney B Margolis Lawyer

Sidney B Margolis

VERIFIED
Income Tax, Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Sophisticated Income and Estate Planning, Income Tax Return Preparation, and Probate Practice.

Sidney B. Margolis earned a Bachelor of Science in Accountancy Degree from the business school at the University of Illinois at Champaign, Illinois, a... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-922-6780

Jay  Kaufman Lawyer

Jay Kaufman

Estate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate

Jay C. Kaufman founded the law firm in 1980. He has spent the last thirty years dedicated to representing individuals, families and closely held busi... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Wendy R Morgan Lawyer

Wendy R Morgan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Wills

Wendy R. Morgan is the founder and owner of The Law Firm of Wendy R. Morgan. Wendy has been practicing law since 1981 and has been concentrating in Fa... (more)

Cynthia H. Hutchins Lawyer

Cynthia H. Hutchins

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Dupage County Wills & Trusts Lawyer | Chicago Estate Planning Attorney | Estate Tax Planning

Estate planning and elder law attorney Cindy Hutchins has over 25 experience practicing law. Her law firm, the Law Office of Cynthia Hayes Hutchins, P... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Kurt  Carlson Lawyer

Kurt Carlson

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Business
Wheaton Divorce Attorney | DuPage County Divorce Lawyers | Wheaton Wills & Trusts Attorney | IL

As a private practitioner in DuPage County, I continued practicing in these fields, and added representation of clients in divorce and other domestic ... (more)

James  Kelly Lawyer

James Kelly

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Criminal, Real Estate
The Law offices of James M. Kelly specializes in divorce litigation and bankruptcy practice.

The Law Offices of James M. Kelly, P.C. specializes in complex divorce and Bankruptcy matters. James M. Kelly, has 21 years of experience in trial wo... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-869-2181

Sean Lanier Robertson Lawyer

Sean Lanier Robertson

VERIFIED
International Tax, Estate Planning, Business, Estate

Attorney Robertson assists clients with family law matters such as child custody (also known as allocation of parental responsibilities), spousal main... (more)

Joseph M. Lucas Lawyer

Joseph M. Lucas

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Personal Injury, Real Estate, Divorce

Employment History * 1984-Present. Joseph M. Lucas & Associates. Owner of general practice law firm concentrating on Business Law, Family Law, Per... (more)

Monica P Patanka Lawyer

Monica P Patanka

Real Estate, Tax, Family Law, Estate Planning

Monica P. Patankar is a partner with the law firm of Piccony & Patankar, P.C. Monica takes a compassionate approach to helping clients solve their leg... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Lisa J. Vedral

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

800-923-0641

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES

An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For examp... (more...)
An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For example, a person would not be allowed to leave property to her husband for his life, then to her children for their lives, then to her grandchildren. The gift would potentially go to the grandchildren at a point too remote in time.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 (ERISA)

A federal law passed to protect pension rights. ERISA: sets minimum standards for pension plans, guaranteeing that pension rights cannot be unfairly denied to o... (more...)
A federal law passed to protect pension rights. ERISA: sets minimum standards for pension plans, guaranteeing that pension rights cannot be unfairly denied to or taken from a worker provides some protection for workers in the event certain types of pension plans cannot pay the benefits to which workers are entitled, and requires that employers provide full and clear information about employees' pension rights, including the way pension benefits accumulate, how the company invests pension funds, and when and how pension benefits can be collected.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Dunn v. Patterson

... for them. The circuit court of Will County entered judgment on the pleadings, finding, as a matter of law, that provisions in certain estate planning documents prepared by defendant were contrary to public policy and void. The ...

Fitch v. McDermott, Will and Emery, LLP

... Around the same time, defendants Joseph Dietrich and John Dietrich (hereafter the Dietrichs), both certified public accountants, provided financial and accounting services for estate planning purposes to Victoria and her husband, plaintiff Thomas Fitch. ...

In re Estate of Henry

... Accordingly, the estate petitioned the court to allow the estate to execute estate planning documents for Henry which, it contended, were consistent with his known wishes and which would be "free from the taint of the undue influence and fraud which was assembled upon the ...