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Chipley Divorce Lawyer, Florida
Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support


Jonna Bowman

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Family Law, Immigration
Status:  In Good Standing           

Clayton J. M. Adkinson

Criminal, Farms, DUI-DWI, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly Dawn Reed

Adoption, Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carroll L McCauley

Dispute Resolution, Child Support, Divorce, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard C. Trollope

Adoption, Child Support, Farms, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shannon Lord

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Winter Spires

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Real Estate, Foreclosure

Stanley E Peacock

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

800-923-0641

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LEGAL TERMS

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

ISSUE

A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called... (more...)
A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called 'lineal descendants.'

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Herpich v. Estate of Herpich

... As part of the divorce proceedings, they executed a marital settlement agreement dividing all their marital assets. Six months after the divorce was final, Appellant and Mr. Herpich remarried. Mr. Herpich died intestate two years later, while still married to Appellant. ...

Jones v. Jones

... Since the divorce, they have maintained joint custody over their daughter. ... During the hearing, Ms. Jones first recounted an incident in 2005, prior to the Joneses' divorce, in which Mr. Jones had pushed Ms. Jones and hit a tray on which she was carrying a sandwich. ...

Taylor v. Taylor

... 3. In the event of a separation or divorce, the parties shall have no right against each other by way of claims for support, alimony, maintenance, compensation or division of property existing of this date. 4. In the event of separation ...