Miami Divorce Lawyer, Florida

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Keith R. Gaudioso Lawyer

Keith R. Gaudioso

VERIFIED
General Practice

Keith Gaudioso is a practicing attorney in the state of Florida. He graduated from University of Miami Law School with his J.D. in 1994. He currently ... (more)

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800-871-5690

Theodore  Enfield Lawyer

Theodore Enfield

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Family Law

The time to think about how a divorce would affect your life is before you file for divorce not after. At the law firm of Theodore H. Enfield in Miami... (more)

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800-725-5690

Howard K. Butler Lawyer

Howard K. Butler

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy, Criminal, Divorce, Family Law, Foreclosure
Broward County Florida Bankruptcy Lawyer

Bankruptcy Lawyer, Howard Butler, graduated from St. Louis University school of law in 1995. Mr. Butler practiced various areas of law in Missouri ( M... (more)

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954-797-5338

Michelle Ortiz

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Norma Iglesias Pacheco

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Insurance
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Donna Tucker

Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Family Law, Prenuptial Agreements
Status:  In Good Standing           

Beatriz Zyne

Adoption, Alcoholic Beverages, Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite
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Hugo Acebo

Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Family Law, Prenuptial Agreements
Status:  In Good Standing           

Arturo R. Alfonso

Adoption, Bankruptcy, Child Support, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jay E Kreutzer

Adoption, Alcoholic Beverages, Alimony & Spousal Support, Americans with Disabilities Act
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Herpich v. Estate of Herpich

... As part of the divorce proceedings, they executed a marital settlement agreement dividing all their marital assets. Six months after the divorce was final, Appellant and Mr. Herpich remarried. Mr. Herpich died intestate two years later, while still married to Appellant. ...

Jones v. Jones

... Since the divorce, they have maintained joint custody over their daughter. ... During the hearing, Ms. Jones first recounted an incident in 2005, prior to the Joneses' divorce, in which Mr. Jones had pushed Ms. Jones and hit a tray on which she was carrying a sandwich. ...

Taylor v. Taylor

... 3. In the event of a separation or divorce, the parties shall have no right against each other by way of claims for support, alimony, maintenance, compensation or division of property existing of this date. 4. In the event of separation ...