Clarence RICO Act Lawyer, New York


Anthony M. Bruce Lawyer

Anthony M. Bruce

VERIFIED
White Collar Crime, Accident & Injury, RICO Act, Tax Litigation, Federal Trial Practice

Mr. Bruce’s legal career has focused on criminal litigation. For 37 years, Mr. Bruce worked as Assistant United States Attorney in the United State... (more)

Gary A. Joseph

Criminal, Misdemeanor, Personal Injury, Residential Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Surinder Kaur Virk

Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Catherine Armitage Berchou

Criminal, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years
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James David Hartt

Labor Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Steven Michael Cohen

Wrongful Termination, Divorce, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard Anthony Adamy

Criminal, Employee Rights, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  57 Years

Arthur Lewis Hadley

Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Michael Timothy Dwan

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph M. Mordino

Criminal, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  50 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

ACCESSORY

Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An acces... (more...)
Someone who intentionally helps another person commit a felony by giving advice before the crime or helping to conceal the evidence or the perpetrator. An accessory is usually not physically present during the crime. For example, hiding a robber who is being sought by the police might make you an 'accessory after the fact' to a robbery. Compare accomplice.

INDECENT EXPOSURE

Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that ... (more...)
Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that his act may be seen by others--for example, in a public place or through an open window--and that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. Indecent exposure is considered a misdemeanor in most states.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

SEARCH WARRANT

An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue... (more...)
An order signed by a judge that directs owners of private property to allow the police to enter and search for items named in the warrant. The judge won't issue the warrant unless she has been convinced that there is probable cause for the search -- that reliable evidence shows that it's more likely than not that a crime has occurred and that the items sought by the police are connected with it and will be found at the location named in the warrant. In limited situations the police may search without a warrant, but they cannot use what they find at trial if the defense can show that there was no probable cause for the search.