Ask A Lawyer

Tell Us Your Case Information for Fastest Lawyer Match!

Please include all relevant details from your case including where, when, and who it involoves.
Case details that can effectively describe the legal situation while also staying concise generally receive the best responses from lawyers.


By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Cleveland Wills & Probate Lawyer, Tennessee


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

William J Brown

Wills & Probate, Corporate, Workers' Compensation, Wills, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

George Nathan Mccoin

Wills & Probate, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Robert Bryant Wilson

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Theresa Light Critchfield

Construction, Reorganization, Litigation, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years
Speak with Lawyer.com

Vance Fry

Military, Elder Law, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Vance Hewitt Fry

Military, Elder Law, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Bradley Loyed Hendrix

Corporate, Reorganization, Labor Law, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Autry L. Jones

Child Support, Wills & Probate, Power of Attorney, Bankruptcy, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Rebecca Garren Parker

Child Support, Divorce, Family Law, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Katherine Hayes

Administrative Law, Elder Law, Wills & Probate, Health Care
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  4 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


TIPS

Easily find Cleveland Wills & Probate Lawyers and Cleveland Wills & Probate Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Estate Planning, Trusts and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.

LIFE BENEFICIARY

A person who receives benefits, under a trust or by will, for his or her lifetime. For an example, see AB trust.

PUBLISHED WORK

An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public o... (more...)
An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public on an unrestricted basis. It is thus possible to display a work, or distribute it with restrictions on disclosure of its contents, without actually 'publishing' it. Both published and unpublished works are entitled to copyright protection, but some of the rules differ.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

CHARITABLE TRUST

Any trust designed to make a substantial gift to a charity and also achieve income and estate tax savings for the person who creates the trust (the grantor).

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Davis

... In this interlocutory appeal, the administrator of the estate of the decedent argues that a petition for probate, filed more than two years after the probate of an earlier will, is time-barred by Tennessee Code Annotated section 32-4-108, and, therefore, the trial court erroneously ...

In re Estate of Ridley

... J., joined. The issues in this appeal are whether the probate court's order construing the decedent's will was a final judgment and, if so, whether the appellee's notice of appeal was timely. ... The probate court entered an order construing the will on September 17, 2004. ...

GEORGIA O'KEEFFE FOUNDATION v. Fisk Univ.

... Mr. Stieglitz's Last Will and Testament was admitted to probate in the Surrogate's Court of New York County, New York, on September 13, 1946, at which time his widow, Georgia O'Keeffe, was appointed Executrix of the estate. ...