Dupuyer Bankruptcy Lawyer, Montana


Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Scott O Swanson

Government
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Marion Curry Passmore

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Jody W Coble

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

R.L. Burk

General Practice
Status:  Suspended           Licensed:  38 Years
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Jennifer M Stutz

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Nathan J St. Goddard

Employment Discrimination, Family Law, Traffic, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Nathan St. Goddard

Traffic, Employment Discrimination, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Joseph J McKay

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Derek Edwin Kline

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Elizabeth Blair

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  45 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner ... (more...)
A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner or partners (called general partners) have unlimited personal liability. The key difference between a general and limited partner concerns management decision making--general partners run the business, and limited partners, who are usually passive investors, are not allowed to make day-to-day business decisions. If they do, they risk being treated as general partners with unlimited personal liability.

TRADE DRESS

The distinctive packaging or design of a product that promotes the product and distinguishes it from other products in the marketplace -- for example, the shape... (more...)
The distinctive packaging or design of a product that promotes the product and distinguishes it from other products in the marketplace -- for example, the shape of Frangelico liqueur bottles. Trade dress can be protected under trademark law if a showing can be made that the average consumer would likely be confused as to product origin if another product were allowed to appear in similar dress.

WORKOUT

A debtor's plan to take care of a debt, by paying it off or through loan forgiveness. Workouts are often created to avoid bankruptcy or foreclosure proceedings.

FORBEARANCE

Voluntarily refraining from doing something, such as asserting a legal right. For example, a creditor may forbear on its right to collect a debt by temporarily ... (more...)
Voluntarily refraining from doing something, such as asserting a legal right. For example, a creditor may forbear on its right to collect a debt by temporarily postponing or reducing the borrower's payments.

GRACE PERIOD

A period of time during which you are not required to make payments on a debt. For example, most credit cards give you a grace period of 20-30 days before you h... (more...)
A period of time during which you are not required to make payments on a debt. For example, most credit cards give you a grace period of 20-30 days before you have to pay interest on the amount of your purchases. Cash advances, however, usually have no grace period; interest begins to accumulate from the date of the withdrawal, even if you pay your bills on time. Also, some student loans give you a grace period after graduating or dropping out of school. During this time, you are not required to make payments on your loan.

FDCPA

See Fair Debt Collections & Practices Act.

LIEN

The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortg... (more...)
The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortgages, home equity loans, car loans and personal loans for which you pledge property to guarantee repayment. Liens created without your consent are called nonconsensual liens, and include judgment liens (liens filed by a creditor who has sued you and obtained a judgment), tax liens and mechanics liens (liens filed by a contractor who worked on your house but wasn't paid).

DOING BUSINESS AS (DBA)

A situation in which a business owner operates a company under a name different from his or her real name. The owner must file a 'fictitious name statement' or ... (more...)
A situation in which a business owner operates a company under a name different from his or her real name. The owner must file a 'fictitious name statement' or similar document with the appropriate agency -- for example, the county clerk. This enables consumers to discover the names of the business owners, which is important if a consumer needs to sue the business.

PRESUMED ABUSE

In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor's current monthly income exceeds the family median income for his or her state and he or she cannot pass the means te... (more...)
In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor's current monthly income exceeds the family median income for his or her state and he or she cannot pass the means test, the court will presume that the debtor has sufficient income to fund a Chapter 13 plan. In this situation, the debtor will not be allowed to proceed with a Chapter 7 bankruptcy unless the debtor can prove that he or she is not abusing the Chapter 7 bankruptcy remedy.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. McWilliams

... 6 4. Whether the District Court erred in sentencing McWilliams to pay restitution of sums that had been discharged by his bankruptcy proceeding. Factual and Procedural Background. ... 12 McWilliams and his wife had filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy in May 1997. ...

Stipe v. First Interstate Bank

... The Stipes then sought bankruptcy protection. Because the Stipes lacked sufficient resources to care for the cattle, the Bankruptcy court granted FIB relief from the automatic bankruptcy stay, which allowed FIB to pursue non-bankruptcy remedies to repossess the cattle. ...

Dovey v. BNSF RAILWAY COMPANY

... BACKGROUND. ¶4 Dovey had financial difficulties which ultimately led him to file for bankruptcy. He first met with his bankruptcy attorney Steven Winship ("Winship") on June 1, 2004. ... 7 On October 21, 2004, Dovey filed a Chapter 7 petition for bankruptcy. ...